Historical Plaques of
Oxford County

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PLAQUE #1

Location: Dundas St. east of Wilson St., Woodstock

ST. PAUL'S CHURCH 1834
This church was completed in 1834 shortly after the founding of the community. It was financed through the efforts of Admiral Henry Vansittart and constructed under the direction of his agent, Captain Andrew Drew R.N. The Admiral also pledged maintenance of its first incumbent, the Rev. William Bettridge, who served the congregation 1834-79. During the Rebellion of 1837 the building became a temporary jail for prisoners captured by local Militia. St. Paul's was consecrated in 1838 by Bishop G. J. Mountain. The Chancel was added to the original structure in 1843 and the Transepts in 1851.

Erected by the Ontario Archaeological and Historic Sites Board

The next 21 plaques were sent in by Dorothy Dahm

PLAQUE #2

Location: At the former college, Wilson St. & College Ave.,Woodstock

WOODSTOCK COLLEGE 1857-1926
Here stood the Canadian Literary Institute which was incorporated in 1857,opened in 1860 and renamed Woodstock College in 1883. Sponsored by the Baptist Church its establishment was largely the result of the efforts of its first principal (1860 - 75) the Rev. R. A. Fyfe. It was a co-educational institution providing training in theology and arts and at one time was expected to attain full university status. In 1881 its faculty of theology was transferred to Toronto Baptist College and in 1888 its ladies department was moved to Moulton College in Toronto. Woodstock College served as a boys' preparatory school from 1890 until it was closed in 1926.

Erected by the Ontario Archaeological and Heritage Sites Board

PLAQUE #3

Location: Wilson St. & College Ave., Woodstock

THE REVEREND NEWTON WOLVERTON

1846-1932

Born in Oxford County, Wolverton taught mathematics at Woodstock College (Canadian Literary Institute) from 1877 - 1891, being principal from 1881-1886. Here he set up the first manual training department in Canada. He also established a meteorological observatory and was a recognized authority in that field. He was ordained a Baptist minister in 1877. At the age of 15 he had seen military service in the American Civil War, and served as an officer with the 22nd Oxford Rifles in 1864-5, and in the Fenian Raids of 1866. In 1891, he was appointed principal of Bishop College, Texas, and in 1901 he was associated with the founding of Brandon College, Manitoba.

Erected by Archaeological and Historic Sites Board of Ontario

PLAQUE #4

Location: Former home, 210 Vansittart Ave., Woodstock

THOMAS "CARBIDE" WILLSON 1860 - 1915
This house was built in 1895 by Thomas Leopold Willson, an electrical engineer who discovered the first commercial process for the production of calcium carbide, a chemical compound used in the manufacture of acetylene gas. He was born at Princeton, Ontario, and educated in Hamilton, where he performed his early experiments. The discovery which earned him his nickname was made at Spray, North Carolina in 1892. In 1896 he established a carbide works at Merritton, Ontario. After establishing a similar plant at Shawinigan, Quebec, he settled in Ottawa in 1901. His varied scientific achievements were recognized in 1909 by the University of Toronto which awarded him the first McCharles Prize.

Archaeological and Historic Sites Board of Ontario

PLAQUE #5

Location: At the public library, 2 Library Lane, Tillsonburg

GEORGE TILLSON 1782 - 1864
Born in Enfield, Massachusets, Tillson came to Upper Canada in 1822 where he operated the Normandale Iron Foundry, Norfolk County in partnership with Hiram Capron and Joseph and Benjamin Van Norman. In 1825 he sold his holdings in that pioneer enterprise and bought some 600 acres of land including a mill site in this vicinity. Here in partnership with Benjamin Van Norman he built a new forge and a sawmill. The settlement which grew around these industries was known at first as Dereham Forge but following the survey of the town plot in 1837 it was named Tillsonburg in honour of the founder.

Erected by the Ontario Archaeological and Historic Sites Board

PLAQUE #6

Location: Presbyterian Cemetery, Vansittart Ave., Woodstock

LT. COLONEL JOSEPH WHITESIDE BOYLE, D.S.O.

1867 - 1923

A legendary adventurer known as Klondike Joe, Boyle was born in Toronto and came to Woodstock with his family in 1872. He worked at various jobs before attaining great success as a prospector and entrepreneur in the Yukon. At the outbreak of the First World War, Boyle raised, financed and equipped a fifty-man machine gun contingent. Determined to help the war effort further, he headed an allied mission to Russian in 1917 to help reorganize the railway system. His adventures soon took him to Rumania where he became a confidant of the Royal Family. He was charged with obtaining famine relief for the Rumanian people and with negotiating a peace treaty with Russia. Much honoured for his effort, Boyle died in England.

Erected by the Ontario Heritage Foundation,
Ministry of Citizenship and Culture

PLAQUE #7

Location: West side of Highway 19, Salford, church parking lot

AIMEE SEMPLE McPHERSON 1890 - 1944
The celebrated evangelist and faith healer Aimee (Kennedy) McPherson was born on a farm west of here. She led revivalist meetings in Ontario in 1915-16 and then barnstormed the United States, drawing large crowds in tents, concert halls and sports arenas. Capitalizing on her vast popularity she founded the Church of the Foursquare Gospel and build the Angelus Temple in Los Angeles in 1923. Sister Aimee preached her message of Christian love daily in the temple's 5000 seat auditorium and over its radio station. She staged morality plays, healed countless invalids, and oversaw social relief programs. Although scandals and financial troubles beset McPherson at the height of her fame, the Foursquare Gospel Church flourished. It now operates worldwide.

Ontario Heritage Foundation,
Ministry of Culture, Tourism and Recreation

PLAQUE #8

Location: Just south of the Thames St. Bridge, Ingersoll

FOUNDERS OF INGERSOLL
Born in Massachusetts, Major Thomas Ingersoll (1749-1812) came to the Niagara peninsula in 1793 and was promised some 80,000 acres of land in the present Oxford County for himself and a group of American associates. He brought a number of settlers into this area before the government revoked the agreement in 1797. Ingersoll moved to the Credit River in 1805. His son Charles (1791-1831) a veteran of the War of 1812 and a half-brother of Laura Secord, acquired the Oxford family homestead in 1817. He became a leading citizen of this pioneer community known at first as Oxford but later re-named Ingersoll.

Erected by the Ontario Archaeological and Historic Sites Board

PLAQUE #9

Location: Highway 19, Just south of Ingersoll

THE BIG CHEESE 1866
Oxford County was the birthplace of the commercial cheese industry in Canada. In 1865 James Harris erected on this farm the first cheese factory in the Ingersoll district. To stimulate interest among foreign buyers, a group of Oxford's producers co-operated to manufacture a gigantic cheese here in June, 1866. Weighing 7300 pounds and measuring 21 feet in circumference, it was exhibited at the New York State Fair and in London, England.

Archaeological and Historic Sites Board of Ontario

PLAQUE #10

Location: At his birthplace, Innisfree farm,
Co. Rd. 19, abt. 3 km west of Otterville

HAROLD ADAMS INNIS 1894 - 1952
One of Canada's outstanding economic historians, Innis was born on this farm. Graduated from McMaster University, he obtained a Ph. D. from the University of Chicago, and in 1920 joined the Department of Political Economy at the University of Toronto where he subsequently became Department Chairman and Dean of Graduate Studies. His works, such as the monumental "Fur Trade in Canada" (1930), largely interpreted Canadian history as a thrust to control the St. Lawrence trace and connecting traffic routes, and profoundly influenced Canadian historical writing generally. His later studies, for example, "Empire and Communication" (1950), investigating the effects of communications technology on cultural values and social institutions helped establish international communications theory. Innis College, University of Toronto, is named in his honour.

Erected by the Archaeological and Historic Sites Board,
Ministry of Colleges and Universities

PLAQUE #11

Location: West side of Highway 19, Mount Elgin at intersection with Co. Rd. 18

ROBERT F. GOURLAY 1778 - 1863
Gourlay was a radical Scot who crusaded for social reform in the early nineteenth century. His activities in Upper Canada sent shock waves through the province. He arrived in 1817 to examine property he owned just east of here and became interested in promoting settlement. To encourage immigration Gourlay began compiling his Statistical Account of Upper Canada (1822). He soon decided that government favouritism and mismanagement were stifling growth. Gourlay challenged the authorities, organizing protest meetings and publishing colourful heated attacks on office holders. Cleared of charges of seditious libel in Kingston and Brockville he was charged under the Seditious Alien Act late in 1818 in Niagara, jailed for eight months, then banished.

Ontario Heritage Foundation,
Ministry of Culture, Tourism and Recreation

PLAQUE #12

Location: Norwich and District Historical Museum & Archives,
Highway 59, Norwich

EMILY HOWARD JENNINGS STOWE, M.D. 1831-1903
The first female physician to practise medicine in Canada Emily Jennings was born in Norwich Township to Quaker parents. For some years she taught school, then, in the early 1860's, she decided to pursue a career in medicine. Refused admission to an exclusively male institution in Toronto, Stowe enrolled in the New York Medical College for Women. She received her degree in 1867 and, returning to Canada, established a successful practice in Toronto. A passionate advocate for social reform, Stowe campaigned vigorously for increased educational opportunities for women, effectively challenging the right of Canadian universities and medical schools to exclude female students. As first president of the Dominion Women's Enfranchisement Association (1889-1903), she also contributed significantly for the advancement of women's voting rights.

Erected by the Ontario Heritage Foundation,
Ministry of Communication & Culture

PLAQUE #13

Location: Quaker Pioneer Cemetery, Quaker St.,
just west of #59 north, Norwich

THE NORWICH QUAKER SETTLEMENT
In 1809 Peter Lossing, a member of the Society of Friends from Dutchess County, N.Y. visited Norwich Township, and in June, 1810, with his brother-in-law, Peter De Long, purchased 15,000 acres of land in this area. That fall Lossing brought his family to Upper Canada and early in 1811 settled on this lot. The De Long family and nine others, principally from Dutchess County joined Lossing the same year and by 1820 an additional group of about fifty had settled within the tract. Many were Quakers and a frame meeting house planned in 1812, was erected here in 1817. These resourceful pioneers founded one of the most successful Quaker communities in Upper Canada.

Archaeological and Historic Sites Board of Ontario

PLAQUE #14

Location: East Oxford Public School, Old Stage Road &
County Road 14, southeast of Woodstock

THE OLD STAGE ROAD
This road, which follows in part the Indian trail, known as the "Detroit Path", across East Oxford Township, was opened by settlers at the expense of Major Thomas Ingersoll in 1796-97. It joined a wagon road opened across Burford Township by local settlers, connecting near Brant's Ford on the Grand River with a road to Long Point from Ancaster. Extended later to Delaware, it became the preferred highway to Sandwich and was used by British and American troops in 1812-14. After 1826 it became the stage route from Ancaster to London until the building of the plank road from Brantford to Woodstock in 1842-3. Sections of the road are still open between Ingersoll and Cathcart.

Archaeological and Historic Sites Board of Ontario

PLAQUE #15

Location: Former residence, 735 Rathbourne Ave., Woodstock

CAPT. ANDREW DREW R.N. 1792-1878
This house was built by Capt. Drew who came here in 1832 as agent for Admiral Henry Vansittart founder of Woodstock. Purchasing land now included in the eastern section of the city, Drew divided it into town lots and formed the nucleus of this community. During the rebellion of 1837-39 he led the Canadian force that destroyed the American steamer "Caroline" which was supplying William Lyon Mackenzie's supporters on Navy Island. This action almost precipitated war between Britain and the United States and several attempts were made on Drew's life. He returned to England in 1842 and resumed his naval career.

Erected by the Ontario Archaeological and Historic Sites Board

PLAQUE #16

Location: Memorial Park, St. Andrew and Argyle St., Embro

HENRY JOHN CODY 1868-1951
Born at Embro and educated at Galt Collegiate Institute, this distinguished churchman and educationist graduated from the University of Toronto in 1889. Ordained to the Anglican ministry in 1893, he was rector of St. Paul's Church, Toronto, from 1899 to 1932. He was appointed Canon in 1903 and Archdeacon of York in 1909. A member, and later chairman, of the board of governors of the University of Toronto, he was Ontario's minister of education, 1918-19. He played a vital role in the administration of the University as president, 1932-45 and chancellor, 1944-47. His outstanding contributions in the fields of education and religion were recognized in 1943 when he was created a C.M.G. by King George VI.

Archaeological and Historic Sites Board of Ontario

PLAQUE #17

Location: Memorial Park, St. Andrew and Argyle St., Embro

DONALD McKENZIE

1798-1884

Born at Dores, Inverness, Scotland, and educated in Aberdeen and Edinburgh, he was ordained by the Presbytery of dingwall, Synod of Ross, 1834 and sent as a missionary to Zorra. In June, 1835, he was inducted in to the Zorra congregation (Log church, Lot 9, Con. 7, Zorra) as its first minister. In 1836 a frame church (Auld Kirk) was built in Embro, and in 1861 the cornerstone was laid for a large brick edifice, with a seating capacity of 1000, and a steeple 52 feet high. Mr. McKenzie taught some elementary education as well as the classics, was instumental in having schools built, and teachers obtaining certificates. In 1844 he was appointed the first superintendent of Education in Zorra.
In 1872 he resigned, after 38 years as Minister of the Zorra Church, having guided 38 young man into the Ministry and many more into the Professions.
Mr. McKenzie died in Ingersoll, April 1884, and is buried in the North Embro Cemetery.

THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH IN CANADA
CENTENNIAL YEAR 1875-1975

PLAQUE #18

Location: The following three plaques are mounted on the sides of a stone
cairn at Cody's Corners, south of Embro, where Co. Rd. 17, Co. Rd. 15,
and the 39th line meet

CODY'S CORNERS
This memorial is to honour Elijah and Phila Cody, United Empire Loyalists, who settled here in 1824, and for whom these corners were named.
Five generations of the Cody family residing here throughout their lifetime were Elijah, Harrison, Elmer, Andrew and Bryden.
This cairn is erected by the Cody's Corners Community and dedicated on the closing of Cody's School July 30, 1966.

PLAQUE #19

Location: Same as above

OSWALD J. SMITH LITT. D.D.D. L.L.D.
Born in Odessa, November 8, 1889, he spent most of his boyhood years in Embro and attended school at Cody's Corners.
His name symbolizes world wide evangelization. In 1928 he founded The Peoples Church, which may be the largest church in Canada, with an income for world Missions of more than one million dollars annually.
As a missionary statesman, he visited seventy-two countries and received the B.R.C.S. degree. His thirty-six books have been translated into one hundred and twenty-five languages of which over six million copies have been circulated.
His twelve hundred hymns and poems make him one of the most prolific song writers. Dr. Billy Graham has called him, "The most remarkable man I've ever met."

PLAQUE #20

Location: Same as above

ROBERT DOUGLAS HAYWARD

OCT. 27, 1927 - SEPT. 10, 1961

Bob Hayward brought international fame to Canada and to this area when he drove the world champion speedboat MISS SUPERTEST III to victory, winning for Canada the Harmsworth (British International ) Trophy August 27, 1959, and which he successfully defended in 1960 & 1961.This cairn is erected to his memory on the former Hayward farm where Bob was born and raised and dedicated on the closing of Cody's School July 30, 1966.

PLAQUE #21

Location: Highway 2, just west of Princeton

COLONEL THOMAS HORNOR

1767-1834

Born in New Jersey, Hornor first came to Upper Canada in 1793 and visited the unsettled township of Blenheim. Disposing of his holdings in the United States, he emigrated to Blenheim in 1795. That year he completed (on lot 15, concession 1) the first sawmill, and in 1802 the first grist-mill in what is now Oxford County. In 1800 he was appointed a justice of the peace for the London District and registrar for Oxford and Middlesex Counties. He served as an officer in the 1st Regiment Oxford Militia and became its colonel in 1822. Elected to the provincial legislature as Oxford's first member, Hornor represented this riding 1820-31 and 1832-34.

Erected by the Ontario Archaeological and Historic Sites Board

PLAQUE #22

Location: Just west of Princeton, on #2, at Princeton
Cemetery near Hornor plaque

FREDERICK CORNWALLIS BENWELL

SEPT. 15, 1865 - FEB. 17, 1890

The most famous murder and murder trial in Canadian history took place in the Princeton area. Frederick C. Benwell of Cheltenham, England, came to Eastwood with John Reginald Birchall of Accrington, England, believing that he was to train and invest with Birchall under the popular Farm Pupil Industry Program. Supposedly en route to a prospective farm, Birchall took Benwell to a swamp on the 2nd conc. of Blenheim Twp. Later, two local woodcutters found Benwell's body, which was taken to J.B. Swarts Funeral home in Princeton. An autopsy showed cause of death to be two gunshot wounds to the head. Though buried unidentified, the body was exhumed and identified by Birchall.
Due to the work of Ont. Chief Government Detective John W. Murray, Birchall was charged with murder. His trial by jury took place in Woodstock before Justice Hugh MacMahon. The case became world famous due to widespread interest in the farm pupil industry, Murray's unprecedented use of newspapers to publish a picture of an as-yet-unidentified corpse, legal use of meteorological evidence to determine time of death and transmission of the trial proceedings via the new trans-Atlantic telegraph cable.
Convicted on circumstantial evidence, Birchall was hanged Nov. 14, 1890- and is buried in the Woodstock Jail Yard. Benwell is buried here in the Princeton Cemetery.

The next 4 plaques were sent in by Dorothy Dahm

PLAQUE #23

Location: Norwich C.G. Walker Memorial Gardens, on Quaker Road,
just west of #59 north of Norwich

On the gateposts and inside the gardens are the following plaques:

In commemoration of the "Old Brick Meeting House"
erected 1850 - removed 1948
These posts erected by
Norwich Monthly Meeting of the Religious Society of Friends
Sept. 1952

PLAQUE #24


1864
On a site across the street from this cairn stood the first commercial cheese factory in Canada. It was built and operated 100 years ago by Harvey Farrington.
1984
Erected to commemorate the great Canadian cheese industry by the Canadian Cheese Centennial Committee
June 1964

PLAQUE #25


QUAKER STREET PUBLIC SCHOOL
S.S. No. 6, North Norwich (Lot 11, Concession 3) 1883-1961
This school was located approximately one-half mile (.8 kms) west of this memorial. The single roomed building, with basement and belfrey, had a slate roof and was constructed of locally made white brick. From about 1900 the school was heated by a wood burning basement furnace. For 50 years a well and hand pump in the school yard was the water system. Coal oil lamps were replaced by electric lights in 1922. All eight grades of the school were taught by one teacher. This school was an important part of the community. Three trustees elected by the local ratepayers administered the school business until 1944. About forty teachers served here and 1000 children in three generations attended this school.

    This memorial was erected by the Quaker Street School Reumion Committee in 1988 in cooperation with the Ministry of Culture and Communications.

PLAQUE #26

Location: In cemetery at Richwood, on County Road 5 southeast of Drumbo

RICHWOOD

This plaque celebrates
the family of John and Helen
Rintoul Kennedy and others
who established a church,
a school, and pioneered farms
and Holsteins in the area of
Richwood.

Erected by the Kennedy Family Reunion
Committee of the 162nd anniversary
of their settlement.

1995


The next 4 plaques were sent in by Dorothy Dahm

PLAQUE #27

Location: on wedge-shaped stone beside
Brownsville Community Hall, Brownsville Road (Oxford Road 20)

BROWNSVILLE CHEESE COMPANY

FIRST JOINT STOCK CHEESE COMPANY

1867- 1897

FOUNDERS - BENJAMAN HOPKINS, ENOCH BROWN, GIDEON HAWKINS, EDWARD YORK, JOHN ALLISON

BRANCH FACTORIES - NORTH BAYHAM - 1869, CAMBELLTOWN - 1870, CULLODEN CHEESE - 1874

600 TONS OF CHEESE PER YEAR

OWNED AND OPERATED FROM 1897-1903
BY EBENEZER AGUR

TWEEDSMUIR HISTORY 1966 WOMEN’S INSTITUTE


PLAQUE #28

Location: on wedge-shaped stone beside
Brownsville Community Hall, Brownsville Road (Oxford Road 20)

CANADIAN MILK PRODUCTS

FIRST MANUFACTURER OF POWDERED MILK IN CANADA AND IN NORTH AMERICA, BEGAN BY PURCHASE OF THE BROWNSVILLE CHEESE CO. SITE BY MR. B.A. GOULD OF NEW YORK IN 1903, LOCATED AT N.E. CORNER OF HINCK AND GLOVER STS. LOTS 31-32. THE JUST PROCESS OF DRYING ON HOT ROLLERS WAS USED UNTIL 1909 WHEN THE MERELL-SOULE SPRAY AND TANK SYSTEM WAS INSTALLED. THIS PLANT ENLARGED TWICE, AND COMPANY GREW TO FIVE PLANTS, AND TWO RECEIVING DEPOTS. THE PRODUCT OF KLIM ORIGINATED HERE, AND IS STILL MFD. BY THE BORDEN CO. LTD.

EBENEZER AGUR SUPT. 1904-1912, GENERAL SUPT. 1912-1922

ROBT. MCARTER 1913-1916, MILTON H. KER 1918-1919, 1922-1953

THIS PLAQUE PRESENTED TO

THE BROWNSVILLE WOMEN’S INTITUTE - 1966

BY THE BORDON CO. LTD. LAST OPERATORS OF THE PLANT

1922 - 1953

PLAQUE #29

Location: in front of Springford Community Centre,
County Road 19, aka Otterville Road

THE ESTABLISHMENT OF FREE RURAL MAIL DELIVERY
One of the most significant developments in the history of postal service in Canada, free rural mail delivery was established largely through the efforts of two Ontarians, George Wilcox and Joseph Armstrong. Wilcox, a farmer here in South Norwich Township roused wide support for the system through numerous newspaper articles and a prolific letter writing campaign. At the same time, following his election in 1904 as the representative for Lambton East, Armstrong became a tireless advocate in the House of Commons for rural mail delivery. Anxious to retain the farm vote, the Laurier government soon responded to this pressure. In September of 1908 it announced the establishment of a limited system of free rural mail delivery, and within a month the first route was in service.

Erected by the Ontario Heritage Foundation,
Ministry of College and Communications

PLAQUE #30

Location: 88 Wolverton St., Wolverton

WOLVERTON HALL
This fine brick house, Regency in style with some Gothic touches, was built about 1854-55 by Enos Wolverton. It retains the splendid circular stairs which originally led to a windowed belvedere above the house’s roof. Wolverton was born in Cayuga County, New York, in 1810 and came to Canada in 1826. In 1844 he bought 200 acres here on the River Nith and, in 1851, laid out a village plot. He became Wolverton’s first postmaster that September. During the depression following the Crimean War he rented this house and moved to Walsingham Township where he built and operated a steam sawmill. He had returned to Wolverton Hall by 1861 and died here in 1892.

Erected by the Archaeological and Historic Sites Board,
Department of Public Records and Archives of Ontario

The next plaque was sent in by Dorothy Dahm

PLAQUE #31

Location: Tillson Avenue and Hyman St., Tillsonburg

ANNANDALE HOUSE
Exuberant ceiling paintings, stained glass, richly decorated fireplaces and woodwork make the interior of Annandale an excellent illustration of the Aesthetic Movement. This international movement reacted against the growing use of mass-produced decorative items in house design, and instead promoted a revival of craftsmanship. Finished in 1887, Annandale reflects the taste and aspirations of E. D. Tillson, an important entrepreneur and first mayor of Tillsonburg. The exterior shows the influence of standardized house designs on Canadian architecture in the 19th century.

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Commission des lieux et monuments historiques du Canada

The next plaque was sent in by Dave Cooper

PLAQUE #32

Location: County Road # 19 at the west entrance to Otterville The transcripts of the cemeteries can be found on Dave Cooper's
'Oxford County Cemetery HomePage'.

PINE STREET FRIENDS MEETING HOUSE
Woodlawn Adult Community Centre occupies the site of the Pine Street Friend's Meeting House built in 1819. The first church, of log construction, was replaced in 1849 by a frame building with porches, which was used until 1893. The Quaker Burying Ground to the east is the resting place of many of the areas earliest settlers.

ERBTOWN

During the latter half of the 19th century, this area was known as Erbtown, a community founded by Samuel Erb, who settled here about 1855 and with his sons owned and operated saw and woolen mills. The Erb family donated this land, sometime before 1861, for the Episcopal Methodist Church and Cemetery.

Erected by the South Norwich Historical Society

The next plaque was sent in by the McRae Family;
Tom, Cathy, Sarah, Daniel, Matthew, Alexander and Nick

PLAQUE #33

Location: In Memorial Park, St. Andrew and Argyle Streets, Embro

REVEREND GEORGE LESLIE MACKAY

1844-1901

Son of Scots immigrants, Presbyterian missionary George Mackay was born near Embro, Zorra Township. In 1872 he founded the first Canadian overseas mission in Tamsui, Taiwan. An unconventional character, but sensitive to local needs, Mackay practised lay dentistry and trained local clergy. He married a Taiwanese, Tiun Chhang-Mian, and had three children. The 'Black-Bearded Barbarian' worked in north Taiwan until his death, establishing 60 chapels, several schools and a hospital. In 1881, he raised funds here in Oxford County to help build Oxford College, Tamsui, which later became a university. He was also an outspoken opponent of the Canadian head tax on Chinese immigrants. An inspiration to the evangelical missions movement in Ontario, Mackay remains a national hero in Taiwan.

Ontario Heritage Foundation,
an agency of the Government of Ontario

The next plaque was sent in by Dorothy Dahm

PLAQUE #34

Location: County Road #19 across road from dam in Otterville

OTTERVILLE MILL
This mill was built in 1845 as a flour and grist mill by Edward Bullock and operated by Matthew Maddison. It is situated near the site of the first mill on the Otter River erected in 1807 by John Earl and Paul Avery. Bullock and his sons contributed significantly to the economic prosperity of Otterville. The Bullock mills which included saw and woollen mills above the present dam were sold in 1877 to E.M. Schooley and were acquired by Soloman Lossing in 1880. Owned by the Lossing family for 60 years the grist mill became known in 1812 as Treffrey Mill. It is one of the oldest continually operating water powered mills in Ontario.

Erected in 1950 by the South Norwich Historical Society

PLAQUE #35

Location: Dundas & Finkle Sts., Woodstock

OLD TOWN HALL
L'ANCIEN HÔTEL DE VILLE
Constructed in 1851-52 this building was for over a hundred years the centre of the municipal and social life of Woodstock. It housed the local government and also served at various times as lecture hall, opera house, and assize court. The design is a particularly fine example of colonial adaptation from British models of the period. Although its lines are basically eighteenth-century Palladian, exterior details such as round-headed windows with heavy surrounds reflect contemporary Italianate Revival influences.

Construit en 1851-52, cet édifice fut pendant plus dun siècle le centre de la vie sociale et de l'activé municipale de Woodstock. En plus d'abriter l'administration municpale, il servit, à diverses époques, de salle de conférence, de théâtre et de cour d'assises. llillustre la manière dont les styles d'architecture britannique se sont adaptes au mîlieu colonial. D'inspiration palladienne XVIIIc sîecle, ses fenétres arrondies à bordure accentuée reflètent néanmoins la néorenaissance italienne.

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Commission des lieux et monuments historiques du Canada

PLAQUE #36

Location: In Otterville, on Church Street/Pick Line about .6 km north
of Otterville's Main Street (Road 19)

Otterville African Methodist Episcopal
Church and Cemetery
Encouraged by local Quakers, free Blacks and escaped slaves fled persecution in the United States and found homes in the Otterville area beginning in 1829. As skilled tradespeople and farmers, these people made significant contributions to local development. In 1856, trustees of the African Methodist Episcopal Church purchased this .2 ha lot and built the first Black church in Oxford County. Later that year, the church was transferred to the newly established British Methodist Episcopal denomination. The church and cemetery served the local Black community until the late 1880s. The small white-painted frame church had disappeared by the early 20th century. Its cemetery is one of the few preserved Black pioneer burial grounds in Ontario.

Ontario Heritage Trust, an agency of the Government of Ontario

PLAQUE #37

Location: On the northeast corner of Light and Hunter Sts., Woodstock

SIR FRANCIS HINCKS 1807-1885
Francis Hincks was born in Ireland. He came to the Canadas in 1830 and in 1841 was elected as Member for Oxford. He joined the Reformers in the struggle for Responsible Government. He was their financial expert, an advocate of railway building and, with A.-N. Morin, led the government of the Province of Canada from 1851 to 1854. After serving as Governor of Barbados and British Guiana, 1856-1869, he returned to Canada. As Finance Minister in the Macdonald government he framed the Bank Act of 1871 which laid the foundation of Canada's banking system. In 1873 he returned to business life in Montreal where he died.

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Commission des lieux et monuments historiques du Canada

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