Historical Plaques of
Leeds-Grenville

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The next 5 plaques were sent in by Greg and Pat McCabe

PLAQUE #1


Location: At the Community Hall, Main St. near the bridge, Burritt's Rapids

FOUNDING OF BURRITT'S RAPIDS

In 1793 Stephen and Daniel Burritt, two brothers from Arlington, Vermont, settled in this vicinity. A bridge, sawmill and school were built here at Daniel Burritt's Rapids" before 1826. In 1830, Henry Burritt, Daniel's nephew, began to develope his property on the Oxford side of the river. By 1831 a store, tavern and several houses were built and, on the Marlborough Township side, Christ Church was begun. A post office called "Burritt's Rapids" was opened in 1839 and later a town plot was surveyed and several additional mills built. With the opening of the Rideau Canal this milling centre flourished but it was later bypassed by the railways and its importance gradually diminished.

Erected by the Archaeological and Historical Sites Board,
Department of Public Records and Archives of Ontario

PLAQUE #2


Location: At the church, County Road 3, Burritt's Rapids

CHRIST CHURCH
Begun in 1831 and completed the following year, this frame church was designed in the Gothic Revival style, customarily used in churches of that period. The Anglican congregation had been formed about 1822 in this part of Marlborough and Oxford Townships, where the earliest settlers on the Rideau had located. It was ministered to by the Reverend Robert Blakey, Rector of Prescott, until 1829 when the Reverend Henry Patton was appointed missionary to the region. Under his guidance plans were made to erect a house of worship. In 1830 David Burritt donated land for a church and a burying ground at the rapids bearing his name. In 1834 the church was consecrated as Christ Church by the Right Reverend Charles James Stewart, Bishop of Quebec.

Erected by the Ontario Heritage Foundation,
Ministry of Culture and Recreation

PLAQUE #3


Location: The historic village of Merrickville, the "Jewel of the Rideau", is located at the intersection of
County Road 15 and Highway 43, on the Rideau River.

FOUNDING OF MERRICKVILLE
In 1793 William Merrick (1760 - 1844), a Loyalist from Massachusetts, aquired from Roger Stevens a sawmill at the "Great Falls" on the Rideau River. Here he built new mills which formed the nucleus of a small community that grew up before 1816 and was known as "Merricks Mills". The establishment of new settlements on the Rideau and the building of the canal, 1826 - 32, stimulated the growth of the village. Streets were laid out and a post office named "Merrickville" was opened in 1829. By 1850 the community contained about 700 persons, two flour mills, a cloth factory and other industries, and was incorporated as a village in 1860.

Archealogical and Historic Sites Board of Ontario

PLAQUE #4


Location: Main St. and Mill St., Merrickville

THE MERRICKVILLE BLOCKHOUSE
When construction of the Rideau Canal began, Merrickville was already an established village and was considered to be a logical target for an invader. Consequently Colonel John By urged strong measures for the protection of the lock station. The result was this Blockhouse, built in 1832-33, the largest on the Rideau Canal and the second largest surviving in Canada. It still resembles its early description as " a good blockhouse, the basement and ground floor being of stone, and the upper storey of wood covered with tin, the whole surrounded by a ditch".

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Commission des lieux et monuments historiques du Canada

PLAQUE #5


Location: Main St. and Mill St., Merrickville

MERRICKVILLE BLOCKHOUSE

1832

This is one of four blockhouses which, with some twelve other "defensible buildings", were constructed along the Rideau Canal. The canal, built 1826 - 32 by Lieutenant - Colonel John By, Royal Engineers, was designed to serve as an alternitive military supply route from Montreal to Kingston in the event of war. The Merrickville blockhouse was completed in 1832 to accommodate some fifty men. It was never the scene of military action, but has served as lockmaster's quarters, a church and a canal maintenance building. Restoration of this fine example of early military architecture was completed in 1965 and it is one of the two remaining blockhouses on the canal which have retained their original forms.

Archealogical and Historic Sites Board of Ontario

The next plaque was sent in by Garret Hoogwerf

PLAQUE #6


Location: Johnstown, Ontario at the junction of County Road No. 2
(Highway 2) and County Road No. 44 (Highway 16).

JOHNSTOWN 1789
In 1789-90 a town plot of one mile square was laid out in this vicinity. Many loyalists, including Sir John Johnson, obtained lots in this settlement. A sawmill and grist-mill were constructed, and in 1793 it was made the administrative centre of the Eastern District. A courthouse and gaol were erected and the court of quarter sessions, which administered the districts local government, met alternately here and in Cornwall. Lieutenant-Governor Simcoe stayed in Johnstown in 1792 and 1795. In 1808 the courts were moved to Elizabethtown (Brockville) and despite its favourable location as a port, Johnstowns further development was retarded by its shallow harbour.

Erected by the Archeaological and Historic Sites Board,
Department of Public Records and Archives of Ontario

The next plaque was sent in by Geof Wyght of Cincinnati, Ohio. His father Frank Wyght,
was instrumental in having the following plaque in Philipsville erected.

PLAQUE #7


Location: Philipsville

JAMES PHILIPS
Born about 1800, Philips settled here in 1825 and soon opened a store and tavern. He became active in politics and, as a Reformer, rose to local prominence during the elections in Leeds between 1834 and 1836. These contests were marked by clashes between Ogle R. Gowan's Orangemen and the Reformers and by a level of violence and intimidation unsurpassed in Upper Canada's electoral history. Philips served on the Reformer's committee of Vigilance and Management and as Vice-President of the Johnstown District Reformers' Society. After the collapse of the Rebellion of 1837, Philips and other Reformers went to the United States. On November 11, 1838, he returned with an invading force and was killed on November 13 in the Battle of Windmill Point near Prescott.

Erected by the Ontario Heritage Foundation,
Ministry of Culture and recreation.

The next plaque was sent in by Carol Orr

PLAQUE #8


Location: At the stone bridge on Charles St., Lyndhurst

THE LYNDHURST BRIDGE
Reputedly the oldest bridge in existence in Ontario, this structure was built in 1856-57. It was designed by John Roddick, then an employee of a prominent local mill owner, and erected by contractors Miles Fulford and Simon Ransom. A fine example of masonry arch construction, the picturesque three-span bridge was built of local field stone, laid in random courses, and is unadorned except for the sandstone wall caps and arch surrounds. It is distinguished by the curved flare of its end walls and by the slightly oblique shape of two of its arches. In 1986 the Lyndhurst Bridge was strengthened with the erection of a reinforced concrete interior frame and completely restored to its original exterior appearance. It remains in regular use today.

Erected by the Ontario Heritage Foundation,
Ministry of Culture and Communications

The next plaque was sent in by Sandra Horwat

PLAQUE #9


Location: On Highway #29, across from the Fire Station, Frankville

LOUISE C. McKINNEY 1868 - 1931
Born on a nearby farm - Louise Crummy taught school in Leeds County and in 1896, married James McKinney. In 1903 they settled at Claresholm, Alberta. A leader in the Temperance Movement and strong advocate of female suffrage, she was elected as an Independent member of the Alberta Legislature in 1917. She thus became the first woman in the British Empire to gain a parliamentary seat. In 1929 five leaders, in the struggle for female emancipation, Louise McKinney, Emily Murphy, Nellie McClung, Henrietta Edwards and Irene Parlby, presented a petition to the Privy Council, which gained for women, the right of appointment to the Canadian Senate.

Archealogical and Historic Sites Board of Ontario

The next plaque was sent in by Dorothy Dahm

PLAQUE #10


Location: Downtown Brockville - Water Street near Ferry St.

THE BROCKVILLE TUNNEL 1860
Construction of Canada's first railway tunnel, which runs from this point for 1, 730 feet in a northerly direction, began in September 1854. Designed to give the Brockville and Ottawa Railway access to the riverfront, it was opened on December 31, 1860. This railway, incorporated in 1853, ran from Brockville to Sand Point, near Arnprior with a branch line from Smith's Falls to Perth. Its first train left Brockville's Grand Trunk station on January 25, 1859., almost two years before finances permitted completion of the tunnel. The Brockville and Ottawa amalgamated in 1878 with the Canada Central Railway, which was absorbed by the Canadian Pacific Railway in 1881.

Erected by the Ontario Archaeological and Historic Sites Board

The next plaque was sent in by Deborah & Geoffrey Wyght

PLAQUE #11


Location: Chaffey's Lock, Co. Rd. 9,

CHAFFEY'S MILLS
Prominent early millers in Eastern Ontario, Benjamin and Samuel Chaffey were born in Somerset, England and came to Upper Canada in 1816. After settling briefly in Perth they moved to Elizabethtown (Brockville) where they operated mercantile and milling ventures. Encouraged by local residents to establish mills along the Rideau River, they chose this location in 1820. Samuel settled here soon after, effecting many improvements to the site. By 1827 an extensive complex including a distillery and grist, saw, carding and fulling mills had been established. A small settlement known as Chaffey's Mills gradually developed. The mills were flooded during the building of the Rideau Canal (1826-32), but shipping and, later, tourism stimulated the continuous growth of the community of Chaffey's Lock.

Erected by the Ontario Heritage Foundation,
Ministry of Citizenship and Culture

PLAQUE #12


Location: At the United Church, H-Way #42 (King St.), Delta

DR. LORNE PIERCE 1890 - 1961
Editor of the Ryerson Press 1920 - 1960, Pierce was born at Delta and devoted his life to the promotion of Canadian literature. He established scholarships at several Canadian universities and in 1926 presented the Royal Society of Canada's Lorne Pierce Medal for distinguished authorship by a Canadian. He edited the "Makers of Canadian Literature" and the "Ryerson Poetry Chap-Books". His writings include: "An Outline of Canadian Literature" (1927); "A Canadian People" (1945); "A Canadian Nation" (1960): and studies of Albert Durrant Watson (1942), Marjorie Pickthall (1925), and William Kirby (1929). In 1924 he established at Queen's University the Edith and Lorne Pierce Collection of Canadian Literature one of the best of its kind in Canada.

Archaeological and Historic Sites Board of Ontario

PLAQUE #13


Location: Near the Locks at Jones Falls on County Rd. 11, Jones Falls

LIEUTENANT-COLONEL JOHN BY, R.E.
Born in London, England, about 1779, By graduated from the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, in 1799. He was attached to the Royal Engineers in Canada (1802-1811) and later served in the Peninsular War. By was sent to Canada in 1826 to superintend the construction of an Ottawa River-Lake Ontario waterway from Bytown (Ottawa) to Kingston. The 123 mile long Rideau Canal, built as a military route and incorporating 47 locks, 16 lakes, two rivers, and a 350-foot long, 60-foot high dam here at Jones Falls, was completed in 1832. On By's return to England charges, including the misappropriation of funds, were laid. Although entirely refuted, they essentially ended his career and he retired to his Sussex estate where he died in 1836.

Erected by the Ontario Heritage Foundation,
Ministry of Culture and Recreation

PLAQUE #14


Location: At the stone bridge on Charles St., Lyndhurst

FOUNDING OF LYNDHURST
Development of this community began after the construction of the province's first successful iron smelter and a sawmill in 1801. On the west bank of the river a grist-mill was built in 1827 and a village plot laid out by Charles and Jonas Jones of Brockville. Originally called "Furnace Falls", this community was renamed Lyndhurst by 1846. Here a post office was opened in 1851. During the next twenty years other small industries were started and in 1868 John Roddick and Henry Green purchased the Jones property. This fine stone bridge was designed by Roddick whose mills and those of Green remained for many years the principal industries of the community.

Archaeological and Historic Sites Board of Ontario

PLAQUE #15


Location: At the War Memorial, Drummond St. (H-way #42), Newboro

THE FOUNDING OF NEWBORO
The settlement of this area was begun during the building of the Rideau Canal in 1826-32 when a major construction camp was located here at the Isthmus. In 1833 Benjamin Tett, owner of a nearby sawmill, opened a store and three years later a post office named Newborough was established. A small community including several stores gradually developed as a trade centre for the region's lumbering industry and agriculture. About 1850 a tannery was established and within ten years two iron mines had been opened in the vicinity. The ore was exported via the Rideau to smelters in the United States. Growth was further stimulated by the erection of a foundry and a steam sawmill and in 1876 Newboro was incorporated as a Village.

Erected by the Ontario Heritage Foundation,
Ministry of Culture and Recreation

PLAQUE #16


Location: On County Road 21, just east of Roebuck

ROEBUCK INDIAN VILLAGE SITE
Approximately 500 years ago an Iroquoian agricultural community of about 1600 persons occupied this site. Archaeological excavations suggest that approximately 40 communal longhouses, averaging nearly 100 feet in length, stood in this village, palisaded with a stout double stockade. The farmers on the site grew corn, beans, squash, sunflowers and tobacco. A similar village, Hochelaga, on the present site of Montreal, was visited by Jacques Cartier in 1535. After this first contact with Europeans, these Indians, related to other Iroquoian-speaking peoples in northern New York and southern Ontario disappeared, although archaeological evidence suggests that some of the survivors were absorbed by the Hurons on the Trent River system.

Erected by the Ontario Heritage Foundation,
Ministry of Colleges and Universities

PLAQUE #17


Location: At the Township Hall, Centre St., Spencerville

THE FOUNDING OF SPENCERVILLE
By 1821 Peleg Spencer was operating a grist-mill and sawmill on the South Nation River on a Clergy Lot he had leased in 1817, having previously owned a sawmill on the site from 1811 till 1814. David Spencer, son of Peleg, took over the mills in 1822 and patented the mill lot in 1831. By 1828 an Inn was located near "Spencer's Mills" and a settlement developed. David Spencer had a village plot surveyed in the 1840's and a post-office, called "Spencerville", had been opened by October, 1846. In 1851 the village numbered some 250 inhabitants with a tannery and other industries, as well as Spencer's mills, which were later rebuilt in stone across the river.

Erected by the Archaeological and Historic Sites Board,
Department of Public Records and Archives of Ontario

PLAQUE #18


Location: At the cemetery at Bellamy's Lake, County Road 8,
west of H-way #29, west of Toledo

ABEL STEVENS
Born at Quaker Hill, New York, about 1750, Stevens served as a British agent during the Revolutionary War despite being enrolled in the rebel militia. After the war he lived in Vermont where, as an ardent Baptist, he became a deacon in 1786. Attracted by Lieutenant-Governor Simcoe's offer of land in Upper Canada, he moved to the province and settled in this area in 1796. A vigorous colonizer, Stevens within two years of his arrival had encouraged some 100 families, many of them Baptists, to locate in Kitley and Bastard Townships. He built mills and laid the foundation for the establishment of ironworks at present-day Lyndhurst. Stevens remained a leader in the Baptist Church in which he had been ordained a minister in 1804.

Erected by the Ontario Heritage Foundation,
Ministry of Culture and Recreation

PLAQUE #19


Location: On County Road 10 where it meets the 8th Conncession,
about 1.5 kms south of Westport

THE PERTH ROAD
This road was surveyed in 1852 to encourage settlement of the isolated townships lying between Kingston and Perth. It was begun and completed as far as Loughborough Lake in 1854 by the Kingston & Perth Road Company, whose president, Alderman A.J. Macdonell of Kingston, was a law partner of John A. Macdonald. Though passable over its 50-mile length as a winter road by early 1855, the road was still largely incomplete by 1859-60, when lawsuits brought against the Company resulted in the disposal of its property at sheriffs' sales. Maintenance of the road was taken over in 1874 by the provincial Crown Lands Department and ultimately by the counties through which it passed.

Archaeological and Historic Sites Board of Ontario

PLAQUE #20


Location: Near the former railway station, H-way #42, Westport

THE BROCKVILLE, WESTPORT & SAULT STE. MARIE RAILWAY
This railway received its charter in 1884, and on July 1, 1888, began service between Westport and Brockville, a distance of 45 miles. Lack of funds prevented the extension of this ambitious line toward its intended destination, Sault Ste. Marie, but it operated for 15 years. In 1903, unable to meet obligations incurred during construction, it was taken over by an American trust company and reorganized as the Brockville, Westport and North-Western Railway. That company was purchased in 1910 by the Canadian Northern which was itself merged in 1923 with the C.N.R. The last train to run on this line left Westport on August 30, 1952.

Archaeological and Historic Sites Board of Ontario

PLAQUE #21


Location: At the Town Hall, Bedford St., Westport

THE FOUNDING OF WESTPORT
Sawmills built by Sheldon Stoddard and the Manhard brothers in 1828-29, during the construction of the Rideau Canal, fosterd the development here of a small settlement. Grist-mills and wharves were soon erected, and by 1848 a post-office "West Port", had been established. Within a decade the hamlet contained 300 residents and several prosperous businesses, including the general store of Declan Foley and mills of William H. Fredenburgh, a prominent lumber exporter. The community's growth was stimulated by agricultural prosperity and the construction of the Brockville, Westport & Sault Ste. Marie Railway, completed in 1888 between Brockville and Westport, which then had a population of about 700. Westport was incorporated as a Village, with 900 inhabitants, by a United Counties by-law of 1903.

Erected by the Ontario Heritage Foundation,
Ministry of Culture and Recreation

PLAQUE #22


Location: On the east side of Blockhouse Island Parkway,
south of Water St., 1 block south of King St. E., Brockville

BLOCKHOUSE ISLAND
On this island, formerly known as Hospital Island, stood the sheds erected to house emigrants who were victims of cholera in the great epidemic of 1832. Many persons died here, including Doctor Robert Gilmour a native of Scotland and president of the first Board of Health in Upper Canada, who was stricken while attending the sick. During the Rebellion of 1837-38, a blockhouse was erected here for the defence of Brockville. It was destroyed by fire in 1860.

Erected by the Archaeological and Historic Sites Board

PLAQUE #23


Location: On the NW corner of County Road 2 and County Road 31,
between Maitland and Prescott, Augusta

THE BLUE CHURCH
On Janurary 1, 1790, inhabitants of Augusta and Elizabethtown townships agreed to build a church here in the "burying yard" of the proposed town of "New Oswegatchie". Subscriptions were inadequate and nothing was built by 1804 when Barbara Heck, the founder of Methodism in Upper Canada, was buried here. In 1809, Anglicans of Augusta and Elizabethtown built a frame chapel, later called the "Blue Church", which served the parish until St. James, Maitland, was opened in 1826. The "Blue Church", unconsecrated, rarely used for services and in bad repair, was partially burned and taken down in 1840. The present small blue church was built in 1845.

Erected by the Archaeological and Historic Sites Board,
Department of Public Records and Archives of Ontario

PLAQUE #24


Location: At the foot of Sophia St. at the western edge of Prescott

CAPTURE OF OGDENSBURG
1813
On the morning of February 22, 1813, Lieutenant-Colonel "Red George" Macdonell of the Glengarry Light Infantry set out from Prescott with a force of some 480 regulars and militia to capture the strong United States military post at Ogdensburgh. The attack was made in retaliation for the recent American raid on Brockville and was contrary to the orders of the commander-in-chief, Sir George Prevost. Advancing across the ice, Macdonell's force presented an easy target for the enemy artillery, but after a fierce battle of about two hours the American garrison of some 500 men was routed and Ogdensburgh fell.

Erected by the Archaeological and Historic Sites Board

PLAQUE #25


Location: On the south side of King St. opposite Fort Wellington, Prescott

BYTOWN AND PRESCOTT RAILWAY COMPANY 1850
This company, incorporated in 1850, built a railway from Prescott to Bytown (Ottawa) for the shipment of lumber and farm products to the markets of the north-eastern United States and Montreal. Substantial funds were raised at Bytown, Prescott and other municipalities along the line. In 1851, Walter Shanly, Chief Engineer, started construction, and a train first ran from Prescott to Bytown on Christmas Day, 1854. The railway, renamed the Ottawa and Prescott in 1855, was the first to serve the nation's future capital, giving it access at Prescott to the St. Lawrence River and the Grand Trunk Railway. In 1867 it became the St. Lawrence and Ottawa Railway and in 1884 was leased to the Canadian Pacific Railway for 999 years.

Erected by the Archaeological and Historic Sites Board,
Department of Public Records and Archives of Ontario

PLAQUE #26


Location: On the grounds of Fort Wellington, SW of the fort, Prescott

COL. EDWARD JESSUP
1735 - 1816
Born in Stamford, Connecticut, he forfeited 500,000 acres near Albany, New York, by taking up arms for the King on the outbreak of the American Revolution. He raised the Loyal (Jessup's) Rangers and served under Burgoyne. This corps was disbanded at the end of the war, its members settling in the present Leeds and Grenville Counties, and on the Bay of Quinte. In return for his services, Jessup received extensive lands from the Crown. In 1810 a townsite was surveyed on this grant which he named after Robert Prescott, Governor-in-Chief of Canada, 1797-1807.

Erected by the Archaeological and Historic Sites Board

PLAQUE #27


Location: On the north side of King St. in front of the town hall, Gananoque

COLONEL JOEL STONE
1749 - 1833
Born in Guildford, Connecticut, Stone forfeited his extensive property there by serving with Loyalist militia during the American Revolution. He came to Canada in 1786 and in 1789 received 700 acres of land on the west bank of the Gananoque River where he built a sawmill and grist-mill and established a mercantile business. Appointed a justice of the peace in 1800 and colonel of the 2nd Leeds Militia in 1809, he was in command when United States forces raided his village in September, 1812. The settlement established by Stone formed the nucleus of the present town of Gananoque.

Erected by the Ontario Archaeological and Historic Sites Board

PLAQUE #28


Location: On the NE corner of County Road 3 and Beatty St.,
north of County Road 34, Lansdowne

ELIZABETH RABB BEATTY 1856-1939
One of the earliest Canadian female medical missionaries, Elizabeth Rabb Beatty was born near Caintown and moved to Lansdowne where she attended local schools. She taught in Leeds County before entering Queen's University, Kingston, to study medicine. Graduating in 1884, she was sent by the Presbyterian Women's Foreign Missionary Society to Indore, Central India. Two years later she was joined by another medical missionary, Dr. Marion Oliver, with whom she co-operated in the opening of a women's hospital in 1891. By winning the confidence of the local population, the doctors helped to lay the foundation of the success of the mission's educational and religious work. Forced to return to Canada because of illness, Dr. Beatty retired in 1892 and lived here until her death.

Erected by the Ontario Heritage Foundation,
Ministry of Culture and Recreation

PLAQUE #29


Location: On the SW corner of Water St. and Centre St.,
1 block south of King St., Prescott

THE FORWARDING TRADE AT PRESCOTT
Before the completion of the canals between here and Montreal in 1847, Prescott was the eastern terminus of Great Lakes navigation. Established at the head of Galops Rapids in 1810, it soon became a centre for the forwarding, or shipping, trade and an important centre in Montreal's commercial system. One of the earliest forwarders at Prescott was Captain William Gilkison, who began operations on this property about 1811. As the population of Upper Canada increased rapidly after 1820, the trade expanded and forwarding firms, including Henderson & Hooker and Macpherson, Crane & Co., established shipbuilding yards, wharfs, and warehouses along this waterfront. Prescott's position in the forwarding trade began to decline in 1847 when uninterrupted navigation from Montreal to Lake Ontario became possible.

Erected by the Ontario Heritage Foundation,
Ministry of Culture and Recreation

PLAQUE #30


Location: At the SW corner of County Road 2 and Bridge St., Cardinal

THE FOUNDING OF CARDINAL
The grist-mill built at Point Cardinal by Hugh Munro about 1796 fostered the development here of a small settlement. A sawmill and store were later erected, and in 1837 a post-office, "Edwardsburgh", was established. In 1858, attracted by abundant water-power and the operation of the Galops shipping canal (1846) and the Grand Trunk Railway (1855), William T. Benson and Thomas Aspden founded the Canada Starch Works. Its prosperity stimulated the growth of Elgin, as Edwardsburgh was also known, and in 1864 the hamlet, with 300 inhabitants, contained several other prominent businesses, notably the James McLatchie foundry. The community was incorporated as the Village of Cardinal, with a population of 800, by a by-law which became effective in 1880.

Erected by the Ontario Heritage Foundation,
Ministry of Culture and Recreation

PLAQUE #31


Location: On the south side of King St. (County Road 2) just west of Church St., Maitland

THE FOUNDING OF MAITLAND
In this vicinity, the site of a shipyard used during both the late French and early British periods, a village plot was laid out in 1824 for Jehiel and Zibra Phillips. Adjacent to it George Longley, a recent English emigrant, acquired an estate on which St. James Anglican Church was built in 1826. Longley constructed the nearby stone windmill, opened a store and in 1828 became Maitland's first postmaster. The community, named after Sir Peregrine Maitland, Lieutenant-Governor of Upper Canada 1818-28, was a point of access to the Rideau area and flourished during the building of the Rideau Canal 1826-32. Other local industries were soon established and by 1850 Maitland had 200 residents.

Archaeological and Historic Sites Board of Ontario

PLAQUE #32


Location: On the north side of King St. in front of the Town Hall, Gananoque

GANANOQUE TOWN HALL
Built about 1831-32, and designed in the late phase of the Neo-Classic style, this structure is among the best of its type remaining in Ontario. Constructed as a dwelling for John McDonald, a local landowner, merchant, postmaster and later a member of the Legislative Council of Canada, it remained in the family until 1911. The earliest settlement at the site of Gananoque took place in the late 1790's, and the first major survey of a village site was carried out in 1842. First incorporated in 1862, Gananoque became a town on January 1, 1890. The town hall was deeded to the corporation by the McDonald heirs in October, 1911, and accepted in December of that year.

Erected by the Archaeological and Historic Sites Board,
Department of Public Records and Archives of Ontario

PLAQUE #33


Location: On the SE corner of Van Buren St. and Prescott St., Kemptville

HON. G. HOWARD FERGUSON
1870 - 1946
Ontario's ninth Premier was born here in Kemptville, son of Charles Ferguson, a local doctor and member of the House of Commons. Following graduation from the University of Toronto in 1891, Howard studied law under Sir William Meredith and practised in Kemptville. Elected in 1905 to the Ontario legislature as a Conservative, he became in 1914 Minister of Lands, Forests and Mines in the Hearst administration. From 1919-23 he was leader of the Opposition, Premier from 1923-30, and from 1930-35 served as Canadian High Commissioner to the United Nations.

Erected by the Ontario Archaeological and Historic Sites Board

PLAQUE #34


Location: At the north end of Court House Ave., on the west side of
Courthouse Square, Brockville

JAMES MORRIS 1798 - 1865
A prominent Canadian politician, Morris was born in Paisley, Scotland. His family immigrated to Canada in 1801 and later settled in Elizabethtown (Brockville). He joined his brothers, Alexander and William, in business there about 1820 and by 1836 had gained prominence in commercial and banking circles. Morris represented Leeds in the provincial legislature from 1837 until his appointment to the Legislative Council in 1844. Named first Canadian postmaster-general in 1851, when responsibility for that service passed from the British government, he introduced Canada's first stamps, and significantly standardized and reduced rates. Morris subsequently served as speaker of the Legislative Council (1853-54, 1858) and concluded his public career as receiver-general (1862-63) in the Reform ministry of J.S. Macdonald and L.V. Sicotte.

Erected by the Ontario Heritage Foundation,
Ministry of Culture and Recreation

PLAQUE #35


Location: At the north end of Court House Ave., directly in front of
Courthouse Square, Brockville

JOHNSTOWN DISTRICT COURT HOUSE AND GAOL
In 1808 the provincial government authorized the erection of a court house and gaol at Elizabethtown (Brockville) to serve the District of Johnstown created ten years earlier. By 1811 a brick structure had been built here on land donated by William Buell, the founder of Brockville. In was replaced in 1824 by a larger building which remained the judicial and administrative centre of the region until the present court house was completed in 1843. Prominently situated at the head of a public green, this imposing Neo-classical structure was designed by the noted Toronto architect John George Howard and constructed by Benjamin Chaffey, a local contrator. Subsequently enlarged and renovated, it retains the arrangement of prison and court facilities so effectively integrated in the original plan.

Erected by the Ontario Heritage Foundation,
Ministry of Citizenship and Culture

PLAQUE #36


Location: On the south side of County Road 2 at Mervin Lane just west of Prescott

JUSTUS SHERWOOD 1747 - 1798
Born in Connecticut, Sherwood settled in Vermont in 1774. On the outbreak of the American Revolution he was arrested as a Loyalist, but escaped to join the British at Crown Point. He was taken prisoner at Saratoga in 1777, and after being exchanged was commissioned as a captain in the intelligence service. From 1780 to 1783 he had charge of secret negotiations which it was hoped would result in Vermont's rejoining the British Empire. Sherwood, who took up land in this township in 1784, played a leading role in its settlement. One of the District's first magistrates, he was also a member of the local land board until his death.

Archaeological and Historic Sites Board of Ontario

PLAQUE #37


Location: On the NW corner of King St. (County Road 2) and Church St., Maitland

LIEUT.-COL. THAIN WENDELL MacDOWELL, V.C., D.S.O.,
1890 - 1960
Born at Lachute, Quebec, MacDowell moved to Maitland in 1897. He attended local schools and graduated from the University of Toronto in 1915. During World War I, he enlisted, on January 9, 1915, in the 38th Battalion, C.E.F. On April, 9, 1917, during the battle of Vimy Ridge, assisted by two runners, he captured two machine guns, two officers and seventy-five men. With the vision of the enemy obscured by a turn in a passage in their dug-out, he was able to convince them that he commanded a vastly superior force. His action eliminated a serious obstacle to the gaining of his battalion's objective, and he was awarded the British Empire's highest decoration for valour, the Victoria Cross.

Erected by the Archaeological and Historic Sites Board,
Department of Public Records and Archives of Ontario

PLAQUE #38


Location: At the foot of East St., 1 block south of King St., Prescott

MAJOR JAMES MORROW WALSH 1840 - 1905
Born and educated in Prescott, Walsh was trained at military schools at Kingston and by 1873 had attained the rank of Major in the militia. In that year he was commissioned in the newly formed North-West Mounted Police. While in charge at Fort Walsh, in present-day Saskatchewan, he became known for his influence and friendship with Sitting Bull, chief of the approximately 5,000 Sioux who sought refuge in Canada 1876-77, and for his role in the negotiations for their return to the United States. Walsh retired in 1883 but fourteen years later, at the height of the Klondike gold rush, he was appointed first Commissioner of the Yukon and Superintendent of the North-West Mounted Police there. In 1898 he retired to his home in Brockville.

Erected by the Archaeological and Historic Sites Board,
Archives of Ontario

PLAQUE #39


Location: At the SE corner of Pine St. and Wall St., just east of the north end of
Court House Ave., Brockville

OGLE ROBERT GOWAN 1803 - 1876
A prominent provincial politician, Gowan was born in County Wexford, Ireland. He came to Upper Canada in 1829 and immediately immersed himself in political affairs. Drawing upon his experience with the Irish Orange Order, Gowan established the Grand Orange Lodge of British North America in 1830 and, as the first Canadian grand master, ably guided the organization during its formative years. In 1836 he was elected to the Legislative Assembly, representing this area intermittently until 1861. A shrewd strategist and an effective orator, he gradually broadened his influence, using his newspaper, the "Brockville Statesman", to promote his political views. Following his retirement from provincial politics, Gowan continued to work for the retention of strong ties with Britain, a cause he had upheld throughout his career.

Erected by the Ontario Heritage Foundation,
Ministry of Citizenship and Culture

PLAQUE #40


Location: On the east side of East St. just north of King St., Prescott

PRESCOTT BARRACKS AND HOSPITAL
The front portion of this structure one of the earliest surviving military buildings in Ontario, was constructed as a residence about 1810 by Colonel Edward Jessup, the founder of Prescott. Following the outbreak of the War of 1812, the stone house was appropriated for use as a barracks by local militia and, later, British regulars. It was soon enclosed within a stockade with other buildings, including a log schoolhouse also converted for barracks. Although a fort was completed nearby in 1814, the Jessup building continued to form part of the strategically located Prescott garrison. Between 1815 and 1817 it served as a combined hospital and barracks store, and in 1823 the British force purchased the house from the Jessup family.

Erected by the Ontario Heritage Foundation,
Ministry of Culture and Recreation

PLAQUE #41


Location: On the south side of King St. just east of the
Gananoque River bridge, Gananoque

RAID ON GANANOQUE
1812
On September 21, 1812, a United States force of some 200 regulars and militia under Capt. Benjamin Forsyth attacked Gananoque. The village was an important forwarding point for supplies moving up the St. Lawrence from Montreal to Kingston and was garrisoned by a detachment of the 2nd Leeds Militia under Col. Joel Stone. After a spirited resistance, Stone withdrew his force comprising two subalterns and about forty soldiers, and the Americans seized the stores and burned the government depot. As a result of this raid, a blockhouse was begun in Gananoque the following month and completed in 1813.

Erected by the Ontario Archaeological and Historic Sites Board

PLAQUE #42


Location: On the grounds of Fulford Place, on the south side of King St. E.
between North Augusta Rd. and Oxford Ave., Brockville

SENATOR GEORGE T. FULFORD
1852 - 1905
Born and raised in Brockville, George Taylor Fulford apprenticed at his brother's drugstore and took charge of it himself at age 22. Five years later, he was elected to the first of 12 terms as alderman. Fulford entered the patent-medicine trade in 1886, and in 1890 acquired the rights to his most famous product, "Dr. Williams' Pink Pills for Pale People". His use of large-scale newspaper testimonial advertising helped expand his business internationally. His headquarters remained in Brockville and Fulford himself maintained a local presence, as businessman, politician and philanthropist. His mansion, Fulford Place, reflected his social status. He was appointed to the Senate in 1900. In 1905, at the height of his career, George Fulford was fatally injured in an automobile accident.

Ontario Heritage Foundation,
an agency of the Government of Ontario

PLAQUE #43


Location: On the east side of Church St., street number 20, north of King St.
(County Road 2), Maitland

ST. JAMES CHURCH 1826
Among Augusta Township's earliest settlers were a number of Anglican Loyalists who, by 1785, were holding services in private houses. The first resident missionary, the Reverend John Bethune, was appointed to this area in 1814. Reverend Robert Blakey served the parish from 1821 until his death in 1858, and during his incumbency construction of St. James Church was begun in 1826. A pleasing example of early Gothic Revival architecture, this structure was built by John Shephard, a local mason, on land donated by a parishioner, George Longely. It was consecrated in 1830 by the Rt. Rev. Charles James Stewart, Bishop of Quebec, and it remains largely unaltered from its original design.

Erected by the Archaeological and Historic Sites Board,
Department of Public Records and Archives of Ontario

PLAQUE #44


Location: On the south side of County Road 2 just east of Cardinal,
Street Number 107, Cardinal

ST. PAUL'S CHURCH
In 1828 Richard Duncan Fraser, the son of an early Loyalist settler, Captain Thomas Fraser, donated land here for the building of a church to serve the Anglicans in this area. Their minister, the Reverend J.G. Weagandt, the missionary stationed at Williamsburgh, was the former Lutheran who had become embroiled in a bitter local controversy when, in 1812, he persuaded his congregations in Williamsburgh and Osnabruck to adopt the Anglican faith. Under his guidance, a stone church was erected here by 1833. Despite the efforts of other early pastors, the Rev. J.G.B. Lindsay and the Rev. E. Boswell, the congregation remained small. In 1872 a new St. Paul's Church was built in nearby Cardinal and, except for this tower, the old structure was taken down.

Erected by the Ontario Heritage Foundation,
Ministry of Culture and Recreation

PLAQUE #45


Location: On Hill Island at the south end of the Thousand Islands Bridge,
15 km east of Gananoque, at the side of the parking lot at the
Tourist Information site, on the east side of the highway.

THOUSAND ISLANDS INTERNATIONAL BRIDGE
This international bridge system links Canada and the United States across the St. Lawrence River and islands from Ivy Lea, Ontario, to Collins Landing, N.Y. It was opened on August 18, 1938, by William Lyon Mackenzie King, Prime Minister of Canada, and Franklin Delano Roosevelt, President of the United States. The crossing was financed and constructed by the Thousand Islands Bridge Authority, a public body created by New York State in 1933, which operates and maintains it. Five bridges of four different types - two-span continuous truss, steel arch, stone-faced concrete rigid frame, and two suspension- with approaches and connecting viaducts and highways cover a distance of about 8 miles.

Archaeological and Historic Sites Board of Ontario

PLAQUE #46


Location: At the NW corner of Water St. W. and Home St.,
1 block south of King St. W., Brockville

WILLIAM BUELL, SR. 1751 - 1832
Renowned as the founder of Brockville, Buell was born in Hebron, Connecticut. Shortly after the outbreak of the American Revolution he moved to Quebec where he joined the British forces and eventually served as a commissioned officer in the King's Rangers. In 1784, after his unit had been disbanded, he settled on a Crown grant here in the centre of present-day Brockville. One of the area's first permanent residents, Buell became an influential local citizen. He represented Leeds in the Upper Canadian House of Assembly (1800-04). He also contributed to the development of the community of Elizabethtown (Brockville) by subdivding his holdings into lots for sale to settlers and by donating land for the Johnstown District Court House and Gaol and for several churches.

Erected by the Ontario Heritage Foundation,
Ministry of Culture and Communications

PLAQUE #47


Location: At St. Mary's Cemetery, H-way #42, west of the town of Newboro

THE ROYAL SAPPERS AND MINERS
In 1827 the Royal Sappers and Miners, the special construction corps of the British Army, raised the 7th and 15th Companies to serve in the building of the Rideau Canal. Comprising 160 skilled craftsmen and labourers under the Royal Engineers, the companies arrived that year in Bytown, where they built military structures and locks. The 7th Company was transferred in 1829 to assist in the completion of the canal here at the Isthmus, the only section beyond Bytown built under direct military supervision. Sappers and Miners from both companies executed other major projects, including a dam at the Hog's Back, and performed guard-duty at various locks. In 1831 seventy-one were discharged in Canada and several settled along the canal as lockmasters.

Erected by the Ontario Heritage Foundation,
Ministry of Culture and Recreation

CEMETERY MARKER #48


Location: At St. Mary's Cemetery, H-way #42, west of the town of Newboro

Royal_Sappers_Miners.jpg - 72482 Bytes

To view a photo of the Old Stone Mill click HERE

PLAQUE #49


Location: H-way #42 (King St.), Delta

OLD STONE MILL
LE VIEUX MOULIN EN PIERRE
The first mill on this site was built about 1796 by Abel Stevens, a loyalist and early industrialist from Vermont. After 1800 the property passed to a member of a prominent local family, William Jones, who by 1810 had constructed the present stone mill. One of the oldest surviving mills in Ontario, it is a fine example of early Canadian architecture and a reminder of the pioneer industrial development of eastern Ontario.

L'industriel Abel Stevens, Loyalist venu du Vermont, ériges ie premier moulin vers 1796. La propriété fut cédée après 1800 à un membre d'une famille en vue de l'endroit, William Jones. Ce dernier construisit, vers 1810, le moulin de pierre actuel, qui est l'un des plus anciens encore debout. Il évoque les débuts de l'architecture canadienne et l'essor industriel de l'est de la Province.

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Commission des lieux et monuments historiques du Canada

PLAQUE #50


Location: On a Cairn on H-way #2, Johnston

FORT DE LÉVIS
Last stand of France in Canada, Fort de Lévis, on Isle Royale, (Chimney Island) was built by Captain François Pouchot in the spring and early summer of 1760. Its garrison surrendered after a gallant defence, on 25th August, 1760, to the British army commanded by Sir Jeffrey Amherst. Siege batteries were established on this point and on adjacent islands.

Dernier poste de combat de la France au Canada. Le Fort de Lévis, sur l'ile royale (ile à la cheminée), fut construit par le capitaine François Pouchot au printemps et au commencement de l'éte de 1760. Après une vaillante défense. sa garnison se rendit, le 25 aoùt 1760 À l'armÉe anglaise commandée par sir Jeffrey Amherst, des batteries de siege étaient établies à cet endroit et sur les iles avoisinantes.

This site donated by James A?????


Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Commission des lieux et monuments historiques du Canada

PLAQUE #51


Location: Lyndhurst, Ontario

LANDSOWNE IRON WORKS
FORGES LANSDOWNE
While the existence of local ore was well known and various petitions had been made for the right to erect a foundry, it was not until 1801 that Wallis Sunderlin, a Vermont founderer, established the first iron works in Upper Canada at Furnace Falls. The works, which included both a furnace for the production of cast iron and a forge for the manufacture of wrought iron, were operated with limited success by Sunderlin and his associates until destroyed by fire in 1811. Attempts in 1815-16 to re-establish the works to supply the Kingston dockyard were ended with the agreement to limit armaments on the Great Lakes.

Bien que l'on connût l'existence de minerai dans la région et que l'on eût fait diverses requétes pour établir une fonderie, ce ne fut qu'en 1801 que Wallis Sunderlin, fondeur de Vermont, créa les premières forges du Haut-Canada, à Furnace Falls. Sunderlin et ses associés dirigèrent, avec un succès mitigé, la fonderie qui comportait un fourneau pour la production de la fonte et une forge pour la fabrication du fer forgé jusqu'à l'incendie de 1811. On tenta en 1815-16 de rétablir les forges pour approvisionner l'arsenal de Kingston, mais la réduction des défenses des Grands Lacs annula ces tentatives.


Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Commission des lieux et monuments historiques du Canada

PLAQUE #52


Location: At the foot of Apple Street, Brockville

FORSYTH'S RAID 1813
On the night of February 6-7, 1813, Major Benjamin Forsyth of the United States Army, with a detachment of regulars and militia numbering about 200 men, crossed the frozen St. Lawrence River from Morristown, N.Y. and attacked Brockville. The village was garrisoned by a company of Leeds Militia who, taken by surprise, could offer no resistance. The invaders released prisoners from the jail, took a quantity of arms, horses and cattle, and carried off a number of residents. The resentment aroused by this raid led to the successful British attack on Ogdensburg, N.Y., February 22, 1813.

Erected by the Ontario Archaeological and Historic Sites Board

PLAQUE #53


Location: Near the water's edge, in a park at Water Street and Park Streets, Brockville

GEORGE CHAFFEY
1848-1932
Born at Brockville, Canada West, Chaffey became a shipbuilder on the Great Lakes and the inventor of a new type of propeller. Subsequently he went to California where, in partnership with his brother, he built a model irrigation project and founded the city of Ontario. At the request of Alfred Deakin, later Prime Minister of Australia, Chaffey went to that continent in 1866 where he began irrigated fruit production in the Murray Valley. By proving that irrigation was practical, Chaffey was largely responsible for the successful development of the fruit industry in Australia.

Erected by the Ontario Archaeological and Historic Sites Board

PLAQUE #54


Location: On the waterfront at the parking lot at the foot of Clarence Street, Gananoque

"PIRATE" JOHNSTON
1782-1870
At nearby Wellesley Island on the night of May 29-30, 1838 a band of Upper Canadian rebels and their American supporters burned the Canadian steamer "Sir Robert Peel". The attackers, about thirteen in number, were led by William "Bill" Johnston, a former Canadian who had fled to the U.S. during the war of 1812. He became a trader and smuggler and, in 1838, was appointed Commodore of the 'Patriot' navy. He participated in several attacks upon Canada during the Rebellion and subsequently settled in Clayton, New York, where he became keeper of a lighthouse.

Erected by the Ontario Archaeological and Historic Sites Board

PLAQUE #55

Location: In front of a cemetery on the north side of Highway 15, 2.3 km west of Portland

ADMIRAL SIR CHARLES EDMUND KINGSMILL
1855-1935
Admiral Sir Charles Edmund Kingsmill was the founder of the Canadian Navy. Born in Guelph, Ontario, he attended Upper Canada College and in 1869, entered the Royal Navy in Britain. In 1908, he returned to Canada to advise Prime Minister Sir Wilfrid Laurier on the creation of a Canadian navy. He served as the first director of the naval service from 1910-1920 and saw the new navy safely through a period of limited resources and political controversy, and the demands of the First World War. During the War, Kingsmill strengthened the command and intelligence gathering organizations, essential foundations for the future growth of the Canadian Navy. Throughout his service he encouraged and supported the training of young Canadian officers who would eventually lead Canada's great naval efforts of the Second World War and early Cold War. Kingsmill was knighted by King George V in 1918. He died at his summer home near Portland and is buried here in Emmanuel Anglican Cemetery.

Ontario Heritage Trust, an agency of the Government of Ontario

PLAQUE #56

Location: On Windmill Rd., 2.5 km east of Edward St. South (Road 18) in Prescott
via King St. E. (Road 2) and Windmill Rd.

The Battle of the Windmill
After the 1837 Rebellions many rebels fled to the United States where a few joined American sympathizers in a new attempt to overthrow British rule in Canada. On 12 November 1838 they landed 190 men here and seized this windmill and nearby buildings. The local people remained loyal, reporting to their militia units; in a few days 2,000 militia and regulars, supported by naval vessels, besieged the mill. Although British guns did little damage to the mill, the insurgents, seeing no escape, surrendered on the 16th. Eleven were later executed and 60 exiled to Australia.

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Commission des lieux et monuments historiques du Canada

PLAQUE #57

Location: On the Thousand Islands Parkway 2.3 km east of
Mallorytown Road (Road 5) opposite the island

CHIMNEY ISLAND (BRIDGE ISLAND)
During the War of 1812 the St. Lawrence was the life-line of Upper Canada along which virtually all military and civilian supplies were transported from Montreal to Kingston. Fear that the Americans might attempt to block the passage of material prompted the fortification of Bridge Island as a shelter for the supply batteaux and a base for British gunboats. A blockhouse was completed early in 1814 and a circular battery with an 18-pounder constructed. These defence works were maintained by a detachment of the 57th Regiment and artillerymen during 1814, but fell into disrepair soon after the war.

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Commission des lieux et monuments historiques du Canada

PLAQUE #58

Location: Along the Thousand Islands Parkway on a gravel pull-over
on the south side between Highway 137 and Darlingside Drive

DARLINGSIDE
Darlingside is a rare surviving example of the wood depots which provided an essential fuelling service during the early phase of steamboat navigation on Lake Ontario and the upper St. Lawrence River. Thomas Darling, a Scottish immigrant, acquired the wood depot in the late 1830s and added a general store in 1845, both of which operated until the late 19th century. Steamers supplied goods for the store and took on cordwood for fuel and other local products for export. Prior to the railroads, depots like this were a vital link between Montréal-based forwarders and farmers and lumbermen in the interior.

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Commission des lieux et monuments historiques du Canada

PLAQUE #59

Location: 12 Court House Street, just north of King Street

FORMER BROCKVILLE POST OFFICE
Completed in 1886 this structure was designed under the direction of Thomas Fuller, Chief Architect of the Department of Public Works from 1881 to 1896. The Brockville Post Office shows the sensitivity often displayed by Fuller and his staff. The basic design with a double entrance and a steep roof was adapted to many small post offices across Canada, but varied here by the presence of superb stonework and a central pedimented gable with flanking gables. Each post office was unique but collectively they shared a resemblance that came to symbolize the federal presence throughout Canada.

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Commission des lieux et monuments historiques du Canada

PLAQUE #60

Location: At the visitor centre at Fort Wellington National Historic Site on
King St. E. (Road 2) 2 blocks east of Edward St. South (Road 18)

FORT WELLINGTON
The first Fort Wellington was erected on this site during the War of 1812 to shelter British regular troops and Canadian Militia defending the vital St. Lawrence River transportation route. In February 1813 these soldiers crossed the ice to capture Ogdensburg, N.Y. When rebellion threatened Upper Canada in 1838 the fort was in ruins. Construction had scarcely begun on the present fort in 1838 when a band of Canadian rebels and American sympathizers attacked; they were defeated nearby at the Battle of the Windmill by troops assembled at the fort.

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Commission des lieux et monuments historiques du Canada

PLAQUE #61

Location: At the right side of the house 1.4 km east of the downtown intersection of
King Street East and Court House Avenue

FULFORD PLACE
Built in 1899-1900, this eclectic mansion evokes the opulent lifestyle of Canada's industrial elite at the turn of the century. Designed by American architect A.W. Fuller, it was the spacious residence of Senator George T. Fulford (1852-1905), who made his fortune in patent medicines. The remarkable fine period interior includes most of the original furniture, fixtures, dinnerware, linens, and objets d'art. The grounds, of which significant elements survive, were landscaped by the prestigious Olmsted Brother's firm.

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Commission des lieux et monuments historiques du Canada

PLAQUE #62

Location: On a pylon on the west side of Stone St. just south of Pine St.

GANANOQUE
A vulnerable point on the vital line of supply from Lower Canada in the war of 1812-14, Gananoque was raided on the 21 September, 1812, when the bridge was destroyed. Subsequently fortified by the Leeds Militia and garrisoned in turn by the 104th, 41st, 89th, Canadian Voltigeurs, Royal Newfoundland, 57th and 70th Regiments, with Royal Artillery support, it became the base for a division of gunboats cruising among the Thousand Islands for the protection of transport.

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Commission des lieux et monuments historiques du Canada

PLAQUE #63

Location: At the former railway station on Railway Ave. at St. Lawrence St.

GRAND TRUNK RAILWAY PRESCOTT
The Grand Trunk was incorporated in 1853 to run from Sarnia to Portland, Maine. Although it took over existing lines, new ones had to be built, including sections of the key Toronto to Montréal line completed by the noted English engineering firm of Peto, Brassey, Jackson and Betts in 1856. The Prescott station, built about 1855, is a typical example of the smaller stations erected by this firm for the Grand Trunk Railway. Influenced by English designs, the station is an enduring monument to early Canadian railway enterprise.

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Commission des lieux et monuments historiques du Canada

PLAQUE #64

Location: 3 km east of Maitland, on the north side of Road 2 street number 1342

HOMEWOOD
Construction of Homewood was begun in 1800 by Dr. Solomon Jones, a prominent Loyalist, local officeholder and early resident of this region. With its balanced five-bay facade, centre hallway plan and classical detailing, it reflects the influence of British Palladianism, while its fieldstone construction and steeply pitched roof echo the Quebec tradition of its builder, the Montreal mason Louis Brillière. In spite of several additions, Homewood retains much of its original character and vividly reflects the way of life of a rural professional man in the early 19th century.

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Commission des lieux et monuments historiques du Canada

PLAQUE #65

Location: On the wall of the court house just to the right of the front door, Brockville

LEEDS-GRENVILLE
COUNTY COURT HOUSE
Symbols of law and authority to a new and changing society, the district court houses of Upper Canada were architecturally prominent buildings in the colony. Of these, one of the most grandiose is the former Johnstown District court house which was erected in the early 1840s and at present houses the county courts for Leeds-Grenville. Planned by the noted Toronto architect, John Howard, the building easily incorporates the diverse facilities of a court room, offices and jail while presenting an exterior of classical and monumental proportions.

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Commission des lieux et monuments historiques du Canada

PLAQUE #66

Location: In Oxford Mills, on the east side of town across the bridge
at 100 Maplewood Avenue, now a public library

OXFORD-ON-RIDEAU TOWNSHIP HALL
This modestly scaled but stately town hall reminds us of the early days of local government in Canada. During the 19th century, the majority of Canadians lived in rural areas, and municipal buildings such as this one played a central role in serving the social as well as the political needs of the community. Most rural town halls were small, one-storey structures, but Oxford-on-Rideau Township chose to construct a larger and more elegant building. Designed by the Brockville architect John Steacey and erected in 1875, this structure continues to serve as the township's municipal headquarters.

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Commission des lieux et monuments historiques du Canada

PLAQUE #67

Location: In Maitland, on the north side of Road 2 street number 1286

POINTE AU BARIL
The barques "Iroquoise" amd "Outaouaise", the last French ships of war that navigated Lake Ontario, were built on this point, then called Pointe au Baril. On 17th August, 1760, the Outaouaise, commanded by Captain la Broquerie, was taken after a gallant fight, by five British row galleys, under Colonel George Williamson

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Commission des lieux et monuments historiques du Canada

PLAQUE #68

Location: On the SW corner of Edward St. and Dibble St. W., Prescott

SIR RICHARD WILLIAM SCOTT
1825-1913
Born at Prescott, Scott was admitted to the bar in 1848 and practiced law in Ottawa. As a member of the legislature of Upper Canada (1857-63) he sponsored the Separate School Act of 1863. Subsequently, he represented Ottawa in the Ontario legislature (1867-73) and was Commissioner of Crown Lands (1871-3). Appointed to the Senate in 1874, he served as Secretary of State in the Mackenzie Cabinet (1874-8) and was responsible for the Canada Temperance Act of 1878. He held the same post in the Laurier Government (1898-1908), and was Liberal leader in the Senate (1903-8). He died at Ottawa.

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Commission des lieux et monuments historiques du Canada

PLAQUE #69

Location: On the wall of the court house, Brockville

SIR WILLIAM BUELL RICHARDS
1815-1889
Born at Brockville and called to the bar of Upper Canada in 1837, Richards represented Leeds in the Legislative Assembly (1848-53) and served as Attorney General for Canada West in the Hincks-Morin administration (1851-53). Appointed puisne judge of the Court of Common Pleas in 1853, he became Chief Justice of that Court in 1863 and Chief Justice of the Ontario Queen's Bench in 1868. When the Supreme Court of Canada was formed in 1875, Richards became its first Chief Justice and continued in that position until his retirement in 1879. He died at Ottawa.

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Commission des lieux et monuments historiques du Canada

PLAQUE #70

Location: At the east and westbound service centres on the 401 between exits
675 and 685 about 15 km west of Brockville

THE MACDONALD CARTIER FREEWAY
This plaque commemorates the completion of the Macdonald Cartier Freeway (Highway 401), the longest freeway operated without tolls by a single highway authority in North America Covering 820 km between Windsor on the United States border and the Ontario-Quebec boundary, it serves the richest economic region in Canada.In January, 1965, it was named by The Honourable John P. Robarts, Prime Minister of Ontario, in honour of the two founding architects of the Confederation of Canada, Sir John A. Macdonald and Sir Georges-Etienne Cartier. This site is located on the last section of construction consisting of 24 km between Ivy Lea and Highway 2, which was completed on October 11, 1968.

The Department of Highways, Ontario
The Honourable George G. Gomme, Minister - A.T.C. McNabb, Deputy Minister

PLAQUE #71

Location: In Elgin, in front of the Red Brick School at the junction of Halladay and Church streets off Highway 15

THE RED BRICK SCHOOL
Opened in 1887, this charming two-room brick school, built by local contractor Fred Taber, replaced a smaller wood-frame building. School Section No. 5 in South Crosby is a very early example of the late 19th century campaign to improve Ontario's system of public education through the construction of better buildings. Committed to fostering social, moral and economic progress through formal classroom instruction, the province's Department of Education encouraged late Victorian era school boards to erect larger, more sophisticated schools. Although local officials were often reluctant to raise the taxes necessary to finance such expensive departmental initiatives, some forward-looking communities, such as Elgin, sponsored the construction of architecturally elaborate schools, which showcased their local pride and commitment to progress through education.

Ontario Heritage Trust, an agency of the Government of Ontario

PLAQUE #72

Location: In Lillies Cemetery on Highway # 15 at the junctions of Leeds County Road # 33

LEEDS BAPTIST CHAPEL AND BURYING GROUND
In the fall of 1798 men from the Stevens settlement in Bastard Township opened a road to the government mill at Kingston. Over the next decade the construction and operation of the iron furnace at Furnace Falls (Lyndhurst) brought more settlers to the area and by 1810 a road had been opened to the mill at Whitefish Falls (Morton). The crossroads on this hillside known for many years as Haskin Corners was a natural meeting place for local Baptists and was chosen as the site for a community burying ground. The first recorded burial was 1811. Although organized since 1827 it was not until 1848 that the Baptist congregation of Leeds, led by Hiel Sliter, Alpheus Haskins and Hiram N. Sweet, purchased the land, fenced it and built a small chapel where lay preachers led devotional services. The religious revival in the 1860s saw the chapel used for quarterly meetings led by Methodist preachers. As Methodism flourished the Baptist congregation dwindled; by 1890 the building had been moved from the property to be used as a residence. It was demolished in 1961. In 1946 the municipality erected a cenotaph to commemorate the sacrifice of those who died in World War II. Lillies Baptist Cemetery continues to be a non-denominational cemetery in the tradition that began in 1811.
Erected in 2011 with the assistance of the Township of Leeds and Thousand Islands and the Ontario Heritage Trust.

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