Historical Plaques of
Grey County

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PLAQUE #1


Location: Craigleith

THE SINKING OF THE MARY WARD
On the night of November 24, 1872, the steamer "Mary Ward" ran aground on Milligan's Reef, two kilometers offshore. Recently purchased by five Owen Sound men, the vessel was making the trip from Sarnia to her new home port of Collingwood with twenty-seven aboard, including a Canadian Pacific Railway survey party when the accident occured. The first lifeboat safely reached shore, then a fierce gale sprang up, delaying rescue operations. After a perilous journey the second lifeboat succeeded in landing but the third capsized and all eight aboard drowned. A group of local fishermen, led by Frank Moberly and Captain George Collins, later rescued those remaining on the wreck, and they were subsequently recognized by the Canadian government for their heroic actions.

Erected by the Ontario Heritage Foundation,
Ministry of Culture and Communications

PLAQUE #2


Location: Craigleith

THE CRAIGLEITH SHALE OIL WORKS 1859
A growing demand for artificial light led to the establishment, in 1859, of a firm headed by William Darley Pollard of Collingwood. He erected a plant here to obtain oil through the treatment of local bituminous shales. The process, patented by Pollard, involved the destructive distillation of fragmented shale in cast-iron retorts heated by means of wood. The 30 to 35 tons of shale distilled daily yielded 250 gallons of crude oil, which was refined into illuminating and heavy lubricating oils. The enterprize, the only one of its kind in the province's history, failed by 1863. The inefficency of its process made its products uncompetitive after the discoveries of "free" oil at Petrolia and Oil Springs, near Sarnia.

Erected by the Ontario Heritage Foundation,
Ministry of Culture and Recreation

PLAQUE #3


Location: Thornbury

MAJOR CHARLES STUART 1783 - 1865

Son of a British army officer, Stuart was born in Jamaica. After fourteen years service as a commissioned officer in the service of the East India Company, he came to Upper Canada in 1817. Devoutly religious, Stuart found an outlet for his humanitarian zeal in vigorous anti-slavery activity. Although most of his written works are polemical tracts denouncing slavery, his "The Emmigrants Guide to Upper Canada" is a useful summary of the progress of areas most suited to settlement. In 1851 he moved to this area where he encouraged the establishment of a small settlement at Lora Bay. On his death in 1865 he was buried at Lora Bay but was later removed to the nearby Thornbury-Clarksburg cemetery.

Erected by the Archaeological and Historic Sites Board,
Ministries of Colleges and Universities

PLAQUE #4


Location: Meaford

FOUNDING OF MEAFORD

In 1837 inhabitants of St. Vincent Township petitioned the government requesting that land at the mouth of the Bighead River be reserved as a landing place. The land was set aside, a town plot of "Meaford" laid out in 1845, and lots subsequently offered for sale. As early as 1841 a sawmill and a grist-mill had been built on adjoining land, several roads constructed to the landing and a post office called "St. Vincent" established. In 1865 this post office was re-named "Meaford", which by that time had become a flourishing community, connected by steamer and road with the railhead at Collingwood. Meaford was incorporated as a town in 1874.

Archaeological and Historic Sites Board of Ontario

PLAQUE #5


Location: Leith

TOM THOMSON

1877 - 1917

One of Canada's most distinquished painters. Thomson was born at Claremont, Ontario County, but two months later moved with his parents to Leith where he lived until the age of twenty-one. After working in Toronto as a commercial artist until 1913, he supplemented his limited income from painting, and fulfilled his love for the Canadian wilderness by serving as a guide and fire ranger in Algonguin Park. An exponent of a distinctive style of Canadian landscape painting, Thomson influenced the work of the "Group of Seven". Among his better known paintings are "West Wind", "Jack Pine", "Spring Ice" and "Northern River". His brief career ended tragically in July 1917 when he was drowned in Canoe Lake, Algonguin Park.

Erected by the Ontario Archaeological and Historic Sites Board

PLAQUE #6


Location: Billy Bishop Museum, Owen Sound

WILLIAM AVERY "BILLY" BISHOP

1894 - 1956

Billy Bishop won renoun, as a pilot with the Royal Flying Corps and Royal Air Force during World War 1 by shooting down at least 72 enemy aircraft and leading other daring missions against the enemy. For these exploits he was awarded the Victoria Cross, the D.S.O. and other medals for bravery, becoming Canada's most decorated serviceman. Born in Owen Sound, he was educated here and at Royal Military College, Kingston. His later life was spent largely in England and Montreal. During part of World War 11 he served with the Royal Canadian Air Force in Ottawa as an honorary Air Marshall.

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Commission des lieux et monuments historiques du Canada

PLAQUE #7


Location: at the entrance to the Durham Conservation area,
Durham Rd., about 1.5 kms east of H-Way #6, Durham

THE DURHAM ROAD
When the Durham Road was surveyed in 1848-49, it crossed the earlier Owen Sound Road at the village of Durham and was given that name. Laid out from east to west through the "Queen's Bush" in the old Wellington District, it crosses Grey and Bruce Counties and is now followed from Kincardine to beyond Greenock by Highway 9 and from Walkerton to Priceville by Highway 4. The road was opened in sections between 1849-51. Allocation of free 50-acre lots along its course began in September 1841, and was well advanced by 1851. Villages soon formed along the route which became a model for later colonization roads.

Erected by the Archaeological and Historic Sites Board
Department of Public Records and Archives of Ontario

PLAQUE #8


Location: at the Town Hall, 137 Garafraxa St., Durham

THE FOUNDING OF DURHAM
In 1842 Archibald Hunter, a Scottish immigrant, led a party northward on the Garafraxa "colinization road" to the banks of the Saugeen River. The resulting settlement was first called Bentinck and later Durham, probably to honour the English birthplace of George Jackson, the first local Crown Land Agent. The establishment of flour and grist-mills in 1847 made the town the major agricultural centre of the district. The Durham Road, another settlement route , was constructed through the town in 1849. Further growth followed, churches were founded, a school organized, and a newspaper, the Chronicle, was established in 1857. By an Act passed in 1872, the Ontario legislature incorporated Durham as a town.

Erected by the Archaeological and Historic Sites Board
Department of Public Records and Archives of Ontario

PLAQUE #9


Location: In Rocky Saugeen Park,
off H-Way 6, about 9.5 kms north of Durham

THE GARAFRAXA ROAD
One of the province's earliest colonization roads, it ran from Arthur through the Queen's Bush to the mouth of the Sydenham River. The original line was run by Charles Rankin in 1837, but was considerably altered by John McDonald in 1840. In that year construction was commenced and completed in 1848. Supervised by Capt. A.M.I. Durnford in the southern section and John Telfer in the northern, free grants of land were made along its route subject to the performance of settlement duties. It opened up Grey County and at its northern terminus the flourshing community of Sydenham (Owen Sound) was established.

Erected by the Archaeological and Historic Sites Board

PLAQUE #10


Location: Beside the old road overlooking the vilage of Heathcote

"THE OLD MAIL ROAD"
For some years prior to the by-law which established it as a public road in 1846, this route had been travelled by settlers destined for the newly-opened townships of Osprey, Collingwood, Euphrasia and St. Vincent. From its junction near Duntroon with an extension of the Sunnidale Road, it ran some 21 miles northwesterly to Griersville. Though it was entitled to maintenance by statute labour, the road was chronically in poor repair. Nevertheless, it remained an official road until its usefulness ended when the Ontario, Simcoe and Huron Railway reached Collingwood in 1855. Save for this five-mile section still in use between Griersville and Heathcote, little evidence remains of the pioneer road.

Archaeological and Historic Sites Board of Ontario

PLAQUE #11


Location: In Bayview Park, Bay St., Thornbury

CHARLES RANKIN

1797 - 1886

This pioneer surveyor was the pathfinder who opened much of this region to settlement. Born in Enniskillen, Ireland, Rankin came to Upper Canada with his family at an early age. He was appointed a deputy provincial surveyor in 1820 and at first worked in the southwestern section of the province. In 1833 he began surveying the Nottawasaga Bay area and settled on some 200 acres of land west of the present town of Thornbury. His more important surveys included; several townships in the present county of Grey; the Garafraxa Colonization Road; the town plot of Sydenham (Owen Sound); the Toronto-Owen Sound Road; the Muskoka Road; and the town plot of Southampton.

Errected by the Ontario Archaeological and Historic Sites Board

PLAQUE #12


Location: In Beautiful Joe Park, Victoria Cr., Meaford

"BEAUTIFUL JOE"

Born in Milton, Nova Scotia, Margaret Marshall Saunders, (1861-1947) taught school briefly before starting her career as a novelist. Her second book, "Beautiful Joe", received international recognition. Inspired during a visit to Meaford about 1892, it is based on the story on a dog rescued from a brutal master by a local miller, William Moore. This novel, first published in 1894, appeared in several editions and enjoyed phenomenal success. It was printed in at least ten languages, and seven million copies had been sold by 1939. Miss Saunders, who settled in Toronto in 1914, was awarded the C.B.E. in 1934, in recognition of her contribution toward securing humane treatment for animals.

Archaeological and Historic Sites Board of Ontario

PLAQUE #13


Location: In Willow Park, Bayfield St. near Sykes St.., Meaford

Rt. Hon. SIR LYMAN POORE DUFF

1865-1955

One of the Commonwealth's most eminent jurists, L.P. Duff ws born in Meaford and educated at the University of Toronto and Osgoode Hall. Called to the bar of Ontario in 1893, he practiced law in that province and in Victoria, B.C., until he became a judge of the Supreme Court of British Columbia in 1904. Appointed to the Supreme Court of Canada in 1906, he was an expert in the field of constitutional law, particularly as applied to provincial and federal rights. In 1931 he headed a royal commission investigating the country's railways. Appointed to the Imperial Privy Council in 1918, he served as Canada's Chief Justice, 1933-44, and was knighted in 1934.

Erected by the Ontario Archaeological and Historic Sites Board

PLAQUE #14


Location: 808 Second Ave. E., City Hall, Owen Sound

THE FOUNDING OF OWEN SOUND
In November, 1840, a townplot in Sydenham Township was surveyed as the terminus of the Garafraxa-Owen's Sound Road. John Telfer, government agent, completed his house by November 21 and a shelter for settlers by the following spring. Four private buildings were finished by July 1842.
"Sydenham" by 1846 contained a sawmill and grist-mill and about 150 people. A post office opened in 1847 was named "Owen's Sound" after the settlement along the Garafraxa Road from Arthur north. "Sydenham" grew as land and water communication improved and in 1852 became the seat of Grey County. The community of "Sydenham" was incorporated as the Town of Owen Sound in 1857 with a population of almost 2000.

Archaeological and Historic Sites Board of Ontario

PLAQUE #15


Location: On the grounds of Georgian Bay Secondary School,
125 Eliza St., Meaford

FREDERICK STANLEY HAINES 1879 - 1960
One of Ontario's outstanding artists and teachers, Haines was born in Meaford and educated at this school. In 1896 he moved to Toronto where he attended the Central Ontario School of Art. He later studied at the Académic Royale des Beaux Arts in Antwerp, Belgium. Working in the realistic style as painter, etcher and printmaker, he tended to specialize in idealized Ontario pastoral landscapes. In 1928 he was appointed a curator at the Art Gallery of Toronto (Art Gallery of Ontario). As principal of the Ontario College of Art 1933-53, he introduced a separate workshop for advanced students and an open studio where students could watch Haines resolve his own problems in painting. Among his best-known works are "Last Gleam" and "Pasture".

Erected by the Archaeological and Historic Sites Board,
Ministry of Colleges and Universities

PLAQUE #16


Location: Queen's Park, 1st Ave. W. & Eighth St. across
from the Owen Sound Public Library, Owen Sound

WILLIAM AVERY BISHOP, V.C.,

1894 - 1956

Born in Owen Sound, "Billy" Bishop was attending the Royal Military College when war was declared in 1914. He first joined a cavalry unit, but in 1915 transferred to the Royal Flying Corps. Courage and marksmanship made him one of the war's greatest fighting pilots, credited officially with the destruction of 72 enemy aircraft. When hostilities ended he was the youngest lieutenant-colonel of the air force and had won the Victoria Cross, the Distinguished Service Order and the Military Cross. During World War 11 he became a director of recruiting for the R.C.A.F. with the rank of air marshall.

Erected by the Ontario Archaeological and Historic Sites Board

PLAQUE #17


Location: Queen's Park, 1st Ave. W. & Eighth St. across
from the Owen Sound Public Library, Owen Sound

THOMAS WILLIAM HOLMES, V.C.,

1898 - 1950

Born in Montreal, Holmes moved with his family to Owen Sound in 1903. He enlisted in the 147th Infantry Battalion C.E.F. in 1915, but later transferred to the 4th Canadian Mounted Rifles. In October 1917, his unit took part in the violent opening assault on the German position at Passchendaele. During this action Private Holmes, under heavy enemy fire, captured single-handed an important "pill-box" strongpoint which had been holding up the right flank of the Canadian advance. He was awarded the Victoria Cross for his valour in this battle.

Erected by the Ontario Archaeological and Historic Sites Board

PLAQUE #18


Location: Queen's Park, 1st Ave. W. & Eighth St. across
from the Owen Sound Public Library, Owen Sound

DAVID VIVIAN CURRIE, V.C., 1912 - 1986

A much-honoured World War 11 army officer, Currie, who is buried in Owen Sound, was born and raised in Saskatchewan. He enlisted in 1940 and was sent overseas with the 29th Canadian Armoured Reconnaissance Regiment (the South Alberta Regiment) three years later. On August 18, 1944, Currie, leading a small force in Normandy, was ordered to help seal the Chambois-Trun escape route to the German forces cut off in the Falaise pocket. He met fierce resistance in the village of St. Lambert-sur-Dives. There, by skillful command and heroic example, Currie sustained his men for three days as they repeatedly thwarted breakout attempts by masses of Germans. For his actions, he was awarded the Victoria Cross, the British Commonwealth's highest decoration for valour.

Erected by the Ontario Heritage Foundation,
Ministry of Culture and Communications

PLAQUE #19


Location: Across from Queen's Park, 1st Ave. W. & Eighth St., Owen Sound

JERVIS BAY PARK

Established in February 1941,
this park commemorates the heroic action
of the armed merchant cruiser HMS Jervis Bay
while shepherding a convoy November 5, 1940
on the North Atlantic. Alone Jervis Bay
fought the pocket battleship Admiral Scheer
allowing the 37-ship convoy to disperse.

Stoker Alexander Milton "Jimmie" Johnson,
who lost his life when the Jervis Bay was sunk,
was Owen Sound's first casualty of World War 11.

Erected by
the City of Owen Sound
Royal Canadian Legion Branch No. 6
Owen Sound Historical Society
September 1991

LEST WE FORGET


PLAQUE #20


Location: Owen Sound Public Library, Owen Sound

SURVEY OF THE GREAT LAKES
In 1814-16 the first Admiralty Survey of Lake Ontario and Georgian Bay was undertaken by Admiral William Fitzwilliam Owen, after whom Owen Sound is named. His successor, Admiral Henry Wolsey Bayfield, completed the first survey of Lakes Erie, Huron and Superior in 1817-25. The work of these officers rendered great service to Canada by increasing the safety of navigation.

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Commission des lieux et monuments historiques du Canada

PLAQUE #21


Location: In Memorial Park, H-Way # 6/10, Chatsworth

THE TORONTO-SYDENHAM ROAD
The northern terminus of this early "colonization road" was located near here at its junction with the "Garafraxa Road". In 1848 the government ordered Charles Rankin, P.L.S., to survey a road from Melancthon Township through the present counties of Grey and Dufferin which would attract settlers and provide a more direct connection between Sydenham (Owen Sound) and Toronto. Free grants of 50 acre lots were given to persons fulfilling the required settlement duties, and by 1851 some 400 families had taken up land. In 1852 almost 40 miles of the road had been opened although portions were still impassable for wagons. Most of this old settlement road is still in use as Highway 10.

Archaeological and Historic Sites Board of Ontario

PLAQUE #22


Location: First United Church, 4th Ave. W. at 21st St., Owen Sound

THE NEWASH INDIAN VILLAGE

1842

Following the Indian treaty of 1836, a Reserve along the western shore of Owen Sound was set aside for the Band headed by Chief Newash. In 1842, the Indian village of Newash, established here previous to the founding of the adjacent community of Sydenham (now Owen Sound), was rebuilt by the government. It contained fourteen log houses, a school and a barn. Wesleyan Methodist missionaries ministered to the Indians, and in 1845 a frame chapel, the predecssor of the present church, was completed. In 1857 the Reserve, containing some 11,000 acres, was ceded to the government and most of the Indians moved to Cape Croker.

Archaeological and Historic Sites Board of Ontario

PLAQUE #23


Location: Hanover

THE FOUNDING OF HANOVER
A tavern established here about 1849 by Abraham Buck provided the nucleus around which a small settlement began to develop. Strategically located at the intersection of the Durham Road and a branch of the Saugeen River, the community grew quickly as settlers, many German in origin, flocked to the area. A town plot was surveyed in 1855 and the next year the hamlet, known as Buck's Crossing, then Adamstown, was renamed Hanover. By 1867 it contained grist, saw and carding mills, a foundry and a cabinet factory. With the steady expansion of the Knechtel Furniture Company during the following decades, Hanover became a significant furniture manufacturing centre. In 1899 the thriving community was incorporated as a village and five years later it became a town.

Erected by the Ontario Heritage Foundation,
Ministry of Culture and Communications

PLAQUE #24


Location: At 7th Ave. & Second St., Hanover

TOMMY BURNS
Noah Brusso was born near Hanover in 1881. He took up professional boxing under the name of Tommy Burns, and although standing only 5 feet 7 inches and rarely heavier than 170 pounds, was a leading heavyweight. In 1906 by defeating Marvin Hart, he became the first Canadian to win the heavyweight championship of the world. Defeated by Jack Johnson in Australia in 1908 he did not retire from boxing until 1920. Brusso's methods of training were used by later athletes, and he wrote a book on scientific boxing. He died in Vancouver in 1955.

Erected by the Ontario Archaeological and Historic Sites Board

PLAQUE #25


Location: At the entrance to the park, Hopeville

AGNES CAMPBELL MACPHAIL
1890 - 1954
The first woman elected to the parliament of Canada was born on a nearby farm in Proton Township. In 1919 women had received the right to sit in the federal house, and in that year Agnes MacPhail joined the United Farmers of Ontario. Elected as a Progressive for Grey in 1921, she retained her seat until 1940. A strong and eloquent speaker, she always maintained her independence from party policies, and was concerned mainly with agricultural affairs, prison reform and the welfare of the aged. In 1942 she joined the provincial C.C.F. party and represented East York in the Ontario legislature 1943-45 and 1948-51.

Erected by the Ontario Archaeological and Historic Sites Board

PLAQUE #26


Location: On a newly built brick pillar, Hanover


IN MEMORY OF
KARL "SPECK" WILKEN
BORN 18 DECEMBER, 1923, HANAU, GERMANY
IMMIGRATED TO CANADA 1926
EMPLOYED BY SKLAR-PEPPLER 48 YEARS
WORLD WAR TWO SERVICE - 1943 - 1945
MEMBER OF BRANCH 130 ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION
MUNICIPAL POLITICS - 27 YEARS
SAUGEEN VALLEY CONSERVATION AUTHORITY - 31 YEARS
HANOVER FIRE DEPARTMENT - 15 YEARS
DIED JULY 1988
KARL WILL BE FOREVER REMEMBERED


CAIRN #27


Location: On a Cairn, on the Grey-Bruce Line just north of Scone

IN MEMORY OF
PIONEERS WHO BUILT
GRACE CHURCH
ANGLICAN

ON THIS SITE A LOG
CHURCH ERECTED BY
THEM WAS REPLACED
BY A BRICK EDIFICE
IN 1901. DISMANTLED
1945

1958 A.D.


PLAQUE #28


Location: In Hanover Heritage Square on the NW corner of 10th Street (County Road 4) and 11th Avenue, Hanover

DANIEL KNECHTEL 1843-1936
Born in Waterloo County, Daniel Knechtel came to Hanover in 1864. Two years later, he began producing handcrafted furniture and in 1874 opened a factory on this site. By using local timber resources and applying the latest techniques in furniture manufacturing, Knechtel built a successful business. Under his direction, subsidiaries were established in Southampton and Walkerton and markets expanded into the Canadian West. A fire destroyed Knechtel's factory in 1900 but another was built the following year and operated until 1983. Active in the community, Knechtel made substantial donations for a hospital, library and Baptist church, and served as first reeve and mayor of Hanover (1909-1911).

Ontario Heritage Foundation, an agency of the Government of Ontario

PLAQUE #29


Location: At Epping Lookout on County Road 7, south of County Road 40, The Municipality of Meaford

JOHN MUIR 1838-1914
Born in Dunbar, Scotland, this famous naturalist, whose books and articles played a significant role in the early development of the United States National Park Service, emigrated with his family to Wisconsin in 1849. Intensely interested in botany and geology, Muir set out in 1864 on a walking tour of Canada West, during which he travelled much of what is known in Ontario today as the "Bruce Trail". His brother Daniel, employed since the previous year at the rake factory of William Trout and Charles Jay, near Meaford, induced him to take employment there also. In 1866 Muir returned to the United States, where in later years he became a leading champion of conservation.

Archaeological and Historic Sites Board of Ontario

PLAQUE #30


Location: In Colpoy's Lookout Conservation Area on the north side of County Road 1, about 11 km east of Wiarton

LOSS OF THE "JANE MILLER"
The "Jane Miller", a wooden-hulled freight and passenger vessel, was built in 1879 at Little Current. A screw-propelled, 210-ton ship 78 feet in length, she was owned by her skipper, Andrew Port of Wiarton. On November 25, 1881, at Owen Sound and Meaford, she loaded a heavy deck cargo destined for Michael Bay, Manitoulin Island. Not obtaining enough wood at Big Bay dock (North Keppel) to reach his destination, Captain Port attempted to reach Spencer's Landing, immediately north of here, but the ship was capsized by gale-force winds almost within sight of it. Some 30 aboard, including her crew of nine, were lost in this, one of Georgian Bay's worst marine disasters.

Erected by the Archaeological and Historic Sites Board,
Department of Public Records and Archives of Ontario

PLAQUE #31


Location: In Chatsworth, at a church on the NE corner of Highway 10 and Crawford Street

NELLIE L. MCCLUNG
This outstanding suffragette, author and teacher was born near Chatsworth in 1873 and moved with her family to Manitoba in 1880. Ten years later she commenced her teaching career in Manitou, where she became an active member of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union and began the writing of "Sowing Seeds in Danny", the best-known of her published works. An indomitable fighter for equal rights, Nellie McClung was a militant member of the Winnipeg Political Equality League which sought the vote for women and the improvement of the conditions of women factory workers. As a member of the Alberta Legislature, 1921-1926, she championed legislation for mother's allowances, improved public health care and fairer property rights for women. She died in British Columbia in 1951.

Erected by the Ontario Heritage Foundation, Ministry of Culture and Recreation

PLAQUE #32

Location: West of Flesherton at a house at Jane Street and Durham Street (Road 4) at
street number 400035, 2.7 km west of the intersection of Highway 10 and and Durham Street (Road 4)

AGNES CAMPBELL MACPHAIL
(1890-1954)
Agnes Macphail was the first woman to be elected to the House of Commons following the enfranchisement of women in Canada. A rural schoolteacher, she joined the United Farmers of Ontario, and ran successfully as a Progressive candidate in the 1921 federal election for Grey County. In Ottawa she fought for penal reform, disarmament, and social welfare, and championed the cause of the disadvantaged. Defeated in 1940, she sat as a CCF member of the Ontario legislature from 1943 to 1951. Witty and forceful, fearless and uncompromising, Macphail left a lasting mark on Canadian public life.

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Commission des lieux et monuments historiques du Canada

PLAQUE #33

Location: South of Chatsworth on the west side of Highway 6 1.0 km south of Road 40

NELLIE MOONEY McCLUNG
1873-1951
Born in Chatsworth, Ontario, Nellie Mooney moved to Manitoba with her family in 1880. As a politician and public lecturer, she campaigned vigorously for social reform and women's rights. A Liberal member for Edmonton in the Alberta legislature (1921-26) and the first female member of the CBC Board of Governors (1936-42), she was one of the small groups whose efforts succeeded in opening the Canadian Senate to women. She was the author of several influential books written in the form of the Methodist and temperance literature of her day, including Sowing Seeds in Danny and Clearing in the West. She died in Victoria, B.C.

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Commission des lieux et monuments historiques du Canada

PLAQUE #34

Location: At the Billy Bishop Boyhood Home National Historic Site
948 3rd Avenue West between 9th Street West and 10th Street West, Owen Sound

WILLIAM AVERY "BILLY" BISHOP AND HIS BOYHOOD HOME
This house is the birthplace and childhood home of Billy Bishop, the legendary flying ace who won renown with the Royal Flying Corps and Royal Air Force during the First World War. In 1917 and 1918, Bishop flew daring missions in his Nieuport and SE5 scout aircraft, and was credited with shooting down 72 enemy aircraft. He was awarded the Victoria Cross, and other medals for valour, becoming one of Canada's most decorated servicemen. Today, the house stands as a memorial to the small-town boy who became a celebrated aviation idol and remains today one of Canada's most recognized national heroes.

Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada
Commission des lieux et monuments historiques du Canada

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